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Hyperledger Sawtooth

Hyperledger Adds Seven New Members

By Announcements, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Chaintool, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

The Linux Foundation’s open blockchain initiative grows to 135 members

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – (April 26, 2017) Hyperledger, a collaborative cross-industry effort created to advance blockchain technology, announced today that seven new members have joined the project to help create an open standard for distributed ledgers for a new generation of transactional applications.

“This is a very exciting time with world class global organizations joining Hyperledger nearly every week,” said Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director, Hyperledger. “The blockchain technology community still has many challenges to solve, and many different possible approaches to solving them. Hyperledger’s open collaboration is key to fostering this growing community and is fundamentally important to getting innovative ideas into production-quality code this year.”

Hyperledger aims to enable organizations to build robust, industry-specific applications, platforms and hardware systems to support their individual business transactions by creating an enterprise grade, open source distributed ledger framework and code base. It is a global collaboration including leaders in finance, banking, IoT, supply chain, manufacturing and technology. The latest members include: CollectorIQ Inc., Korea Exchange, Shanghai Onechain Information Technology, Shenzhen Forms Syntron Information, The State of Illinois, The Netherlands Organization for applied scientific research (TNO) and 1worldblockchain.

New member quotes:

CollectorIQ Inc.

“CollectorIQ’s data and analytics platform aims to unlock liquidity in the $6 trillion global fine art and collectibles market,” said Christopher E. Vroom, CFA / CEO / CIQ of CollectorIQ Inc. “We’ve assembled the world’s largest public and private market dataset, which is the first step towards greater transparency and, ultimately, higher transaction velocity. The distributed ledger promises to increase trust and veracity of and in asset authenticity which we view as a fundamental requirement for broad-based participation. Over the next ten years, we expect blockchain strategies to drive an incremental $200 billion in sales activity in this vertical. We’re thrilled to be a part of Hyperledger and hope that we can meaningfully contribute to open-source innovation within this growing network of like-minded entrepreneurs.”

Korea Exchange

“Joining Hyperledger will open the gateway to the blockchain technology for the Korean capital market,” said Hong Hee Shin, CIO of the Korea Exchange. “As it has strived to transform the traditional financial industry into innovative business, the Korea Exchange will keep driving the Korean capital market to adopt and develop distributed ledger technology that will benefit all market participants and investors. The collaboration with Hyperledger and member firms will accelerate its effort to reach the goal.”

Shanghai Onechain Information Technology

“Onechain technology, a financial technology company in China, is excited to have joined Hyperledger as an open source initiative that promotes blockchain digital technology and transaction verification,” Mr. George Zhou, the general manager of Onechain technology. “Members can cooperate with each other to build an open platform and meet the needs of different industries from multiple use cases and streamline business processes. The success of joining, not only marks that Onechain technology has gained further acceptance in the field of blockchain, but also provides a good opportunity for us to cooperate with other members. And our goal is to become the blockchain integrated application solutions expert in the future.”

Shenzhen Forms Syntron Information

“Since its inception in 2003, Forms Syntron has been focusing on providing comprehensive IT services for the banking industry,” said Frank Chow, chairman of Forms Syntron. “We believe blockchain will take an important position in the banking industry. Being a member of Hyperledger will facilitate our blockchain technology, accelerate our development of fintech applications, and also promote the implementation of innovative blockchain applications for the banking industry.”

1worldblockchain

“The recent partnership between 1worldblockchain.com and the Hyperledger global community is a big step toward ensuring workable Blockchain standards, whilst staying true to the theme of DLT open source,” said Edward Ng, CEO of 1worldblockchain.com (1WB). “Our goal is to provide a robust Blockchain platform and business solutions development to facilitate an even better operational environment for the Fintech industry.  The Fintech operating environment needs industry standardized stability in order for it to move forward at an optimal and sustainable pace, as it replaces the outmoded, slow and inconvenient traditional X-border wire transfers systems. We at 1worldblockchain are looking forward to supporting the goodwill and contributing to the success of Hyperledger as part of The Linux Foundation.”

To see a full list of member companies, visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/about/members. If you’re interested in joining Hyperledger as a member company, please visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/about/join

About Hyperledger

Hyperledger is an open source collaborative effort created to advance blockchain technology by addressing important features for a cross-industry open standard for distributed ledgers. It is a global collaboration including leaders in finance, banking, Internet of Things, supply chains, manufacturing and Technology. The Linux Foundation hosts Hyperledger as a Collaborative Project under the foundation. To learn more, visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/.

(4.6.17) CoinDesk: Intel Demos Seafood Tracking on Sawtooth Lake Blockchain

By Hyperledger Sawtooth, News

The ocean-to-table movement is getting a high-tech helping hand.

Intel has just revealed a public demo that finds it showcasing how a seafood supply chain project can be built using its open-source Sawtooth Lake codebase. As such, the project is the latest that finds the tech giant illustrating the power of its offering, following a bond-trading demo launched late last month.

More here.

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By Blog, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are updates on Blockchain Explorer, Fabric, Cello, Iroha and Sawtooth Lake during March.

Blockchain Explorer

  • Latest architecture document is now available on wiki.hyperledger.org
  • Created several Jira tickets required to complete the functionality
  • Completed the initial setup using the latest architecture as proposed in the architecture document

Fabric

  • We published the v1.0-alpha release [1,2,3] of Fabric, Fabric-ca and Fabric-sdk-node. Work now pivots towards testing, bug fixing and further hardening of the release. The maintainers will publish periodic releases as the code further stabilizes.
  • The TSC also approved incubation of a new Fabric SDK for Go. That project will be on-boarded shortly.
  • There is an active proposal to incubate the Fabric-Composer project, but the TSC needs another week of review and discussion. There seems to be interest beyond Fabric that warrants exploration.
  • Planning for a “connect-a-thon” across multiple cloud providers – one that demonstrates that Fabric can be deployed to multiple cloud platforms and integrated into a highly distributed and heterogeneous consortia network – is under way with a number of community members interested in contributing to that effort.

[1] https://github.com/hyperledger/fabric/releases/tag/v1.0.0-alpha

[2] https://github.com/hyperledger/fabric-ca/releases/tag/v1.0.0-alpha

[3] https://github.com/hyperledger/fabric-sdk-node/releases/tag/v1.0.0-alpha

Cello

  • Finished the operational dashboard theme supports, now we support flexible dashboards based on different requirements.
  • Fixed deployment issues from the mailing list and Rocket.Chat, many users show their favorites in Cello.
  • Started implementing fabric 1.0 supports, new features on chaincode lifecycle management are being discussed and will be planed.

Iroha

  • We added a python library and scala library.
  • API is being refactored to match the new flatbuffer data scheme. This should be completed this month.
  • Ametsuchi, the flatbuffer database, is mostly finished. The first version and integration into Iroha should be completed this month.
  • We are currently targeting a v1.0 release of Iroha by the end of April.
  • A very successful hackathon was hosted by the University of Tokyo on March 11-12, where several teams made interesting applications on top of Iroha.

Sawtooth Lake

  • Sawtooth Lake was awarded 2016 Open Source Rookie of the Year by Black Duck software.
    • Previous winners include OpenStack, Ansible, Docker, and Rocket.Chat.
  • New features continue under master (0-8 branch).
    • 0-8 is approaching MVP feature parity with stable (0-7) along with its new capabilities.
    • Recent new features in 0-8 include on-chain configuration and new CLI tools to build transactions including those configuration transactions

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

Happy coding!

[VIDEO] Hyperledger Interviews Dan Middleton

By Blog, Hyperledger Sawtooth

We recently sat down with Dan Middleton, Head of Technology for Intel’s Blockchain and Distributed Ledger program, as well as maintainer of the Hyperledger Sawtooth Lake project. Dan is also part of Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC) and Governing Board.

In the interview, Dan explains that Intel is a strong believer in the advancement of open source software, which is a big reason why they got involved with Hyperledger and The Linux Foundation. He goes on to say Hyperledger Sawtooth Lake is a full featured blockchain with novel consensus and transaction layers. At the consensus layer it utilizes Proof of Elapsed Time (PoET), which helps express a range of policies between public and private for a ledger deployment. Hyperledger Sawtooth Lake also has transaction families which helps create a safe smart contract.

Dan concludes by saying that in addition to the efficiencies promised by blockchain technology, Intel is most excited about the new business models that can arise out of being able to share state among different entities.

Watch the full video below!

 

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By Blog, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Chaintool, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are updates on Blockchain Explorer, Cello, Fabric, Sawtooth Lake and Iroha during February.

Blockchain Explorer

We completed the architecture review with the community and incorporated the feedback into the design document. The design document was posted on the “blockchain-explorer” channel on Rocket.Chat. We plan to upload this document to the Hyperledger wiki so that it is permanently available for anyone to review. We are continuing our work to make Explorer compatible with the Fabric 1.0 project.

Sawtooth Lake

New design updates were presented at the Hyperledger hackfest on Feb 1-2 and other Hyperledger forums. Parallel execution and new language support resounded well with the community. In the next month, we will begin work on new demonstration networks exhibiting some of the use cases prototyped using Sawtooth Lake.

Fabric

Fabric continues to press forward to wrapping up feature development for the 1.0 release. The team is preparing a version 1.0 preview initially, followed by an -alpha release by the end of February.

We’ve been bolstering our test frameworks with integration testing that had been developed by IBM for its offerings. We have also been taking a close look at improving documentation to make it more user and application-developer focused.

We had some interesting discussions with the Sawtooth team on integrating PoET into Fabric at the bi-monthly hackfest, which we hope to begin pursuing in the near term and we also continued working with the Sorimitsu team in aligning APIs.

Hyperledger Fabric played a prominent role in the largest blockchain hackathon to date, held in Groningen, Netherlands, Feb 10-12. 55 teams competed in five tracks and two of the five winning teams based their solution on Hyperledger Fabric. The other winning teams used Ethereum or Factom. Roughly half of the 55 teams were also using Hyperledger Fabric. It really was an exciting event and bodes well for the upcoming hackathon in Shanghai in March.

Cello

There are lots of discussions on the Rocket.Chat channel, mostly on documentations and deployment topics. Several Jira tasks were created as the feature roadmap, including refining documentation, supporting fabric 1.0 and supporting other blockchain platforms. We implemented the new dashboard configurations and refined the front-end code. Several deployment enhancement/patch sets are in the works to make Cello more stable.

Iroha

The API has been fixed and currently we are working on porting all the protobuf code to flatbuffers. There are several bugs/memory leaks with flatbuffers still, so we have been working with their project to fix these. We have also been working on getting flatbuffers working with grpc.

We are building a database for flatbuffers, iroha-ametsuchi. Anyone interested in working on it should take a look at the repository: https://github.com/hyperledger/iroha-ametsuchi

At the Hyperledger hackfest in San Francisco, we had an interesting discussion with IBM, where we outlined some ideas for creating inter-ledger transactions between Iroha and Fabric. If anyone in the community is interested in working on this together with us, please tell us on Rocket.Chat/gitter/github issue (https://github.com/hyperledger/iroha/issues/159).

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects and help us shape the future of blockchain. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

Happy coding!

 

Meet Sawtooth Lake

By Blog, Hyperledger Sawtooth

By Dan Middleton, Sawtooth Lake Maintainer*

When I was asked to post about Sawtooth Lake, an obvious topic was “What is Sawtooth?”  Well, Sawtooth Lake is a distributed ledger with novel consensus and transaction handling, incubated under the Hyperledger umbrella.

But maybe a more interesting question is “Why is Sawtooth?”  Given the profusion of bitcoin forks and other blockchains why create another system?  In a nutshell, there are usages that shouldn’t be contorted on top of a currency or on top of a centralized database – even if it’s replicated.


1-mrhyperledger-300x94 Originally, Sawtooth Lake was designed to explore scalability, security, and privacy questions prompted by the original distributed ledgers. That mandated a certain modularity that was lacking at the time. Starting from scratch allowed us to employ lessons from those pioneering systems and branch into usages that the original currency ledgers weren’t intended to address. PoET, the new consensus hits scalability, while Transaction Families, our contract logic, narrow the attack surface for contracts while simultaneously broadening the functionality. We also have a keen interest in trusted execution environments and what role that can play in private transactions.

In branching into new business cases, we felt it was important that the system preserve certain tenants of a distributed ledger. That is, in an enterprise deployment, the concept of a distributed ledger shouldn’t collapse into a replicated database. Enterprise participants need autonomy and they have the right to run their own nodes. The set of participants will also be dynamic and the system – particularly consensus – must accommodate that volatility. It is not clear, for example, whether an O(n2) protocol with fixed membership like PBFT can support the scale or volatility of a distributed ledger at production levels. Finally, we observed that, “public” and “private” define a spectrum of authorization policies – not a binary option for a distributed ledger.


Since open sourcing earlier this year, we’ve learned a lot from industry trials. Sawtooth Lake’s pluggable Transaction Families have enabled its use in exploratory projects across several industries, including recent public announcements of a global deployment in finance and as the reference platform for a music industry initiative. Likewise pluggable consensus allows Sawtooth Lake to be used in small tightly held networks or large broadly open networks. If there’s a sweet spot for Sawtooth Lake, though, it’s the Consortium Ledger.

Consortia

Before getting into the novelties of Sawtooth lake, it’s worth motivating the problem space.  There are plenty of replicated databases.  We want to build a truly distributed ledger.  The business models in this space involve tens to hundreds of business entities.  That puts some unique demands on the underlying distributed system.


2-pluribus-300x113 Consortiums fit the bill for Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) as a collection of related, but not fully trusting organizations, that can benefit from a shared view of data. One of the promises of DLT is that it creates win-win opportunities for organizations to open up silos. Eliminating intermediaries is an often cited benefit, but to me, DLT isn’t just about efficiencies, it’s about unlocking new ways to grow.

Consider a motivating example from supply chain, let’s say you want your product to use only ethically sourced minerals, but your company is several steps removed from mining the raw materials, refining them, etc. A shared ledger recording each transfer from materials harvesting to product assembly would let you trace the provenance and gain confidence that the end product is ethically sourced. To work well, that shared database needs input from a variety of companies. Without a shared ledger, it’s more difficult for any of the suppliers or retailers to advertise and capture the value of the ethical sourcing. While it might be possible to accomplish that with a single, centralized database managed by a governing entity, a DLT offers better and perhaps necessary features.

In too simple of an example, the supply chain has a single chain of relationships or perhaps a radial network with a center – which, importantly, could be served by a traditional, centralized database.

3-supplychain-768x174Overly Simplistic Supply Chain.

A real ecosystem, however, has a web of relationships. By looking at only one node in that network, its direct connections form a natural group that suggests it could be supported with a centralized database. But by observing that each of these nodes has a nexus of relationships – it’s own centrality – it’s clear there’s no single, central database that makes sense. Consider also the kinds of data that are relevant and not relevant to each peer.

ecosystem_comparisonA DLT is ideal for this kind of scenario where relationships and dependencies are many and varied.

We believe that a truly distributed ledger should provide autonomy to each participant, and that participants should be allowed to run their own nodes. A consortium may develop rules for authorizing participants, but centralizing the nodes and the control defeats the purpose of distribution and fails to satisfy the actual requirements of the participants.

Realistically, participating companies will be dynamic, entering and leaving the system as their business dictate. This mandates a truly distributed system, not just a replicated database.

PoET

Realizing this distributed ledger vision requires technology choices that satisfy requirements for autonomy and dynamic membership. In DLT the choice of consensus has a dramatic effect on the system as a whole. Sawtooth employs an experimental consensus algorithm we call Proof of Elapsed Time, or PoET. It’s a form of random leader election, wherein each validator node waits a random amount of time before trying to claim a block. In other random leader election algorithms like Proof of Work, that randomness is enforced by searching for partial hash collisions. PoET replaces that work with trusted computing.

6-nantucket-300x96The benefit of this is a more economical and greener algorithm (as compared to ASIC mining rigs). Rather than chips churning on hash functions, the trusted computing functions allow each node to get on with other work until its timer expires, putting computing cycles into useful operations without wasted electricity. PoET is a return to the Satoshi intent of “one-CPU-one-vote”.

In its original form PoET exists near the unpermissioned end of the policy spectrum. Any host that can provide certain cryptographic proofs about the correctness of its execution can publish a block. The sawtooth-core maintainers have begun adding scaffolding to support the more direct authorization models that consortia may require. The first policies in this new framework include basic requirements of a validator such that it is running the correct version of the consensus algorithm and that it has a verifiably unique identity on the network (an anti-sybil feature of PoET). The network itself validates authorization of each node as it joins the system. Once validated, those nodes and their authorization data are committed to a table on the ledger, called the Validator Registry. Building on these new features, participants in a network can define arbitrarily elaborate (or simple) authorization policies. This authorization framework then lets the underlying PoET consensus algorithm be utilized across a wide swath of the public to private ledger spectrum.

Family Ties

Transaction Families are unique to Sawtooth Lake. Transaction logic is, of course, another area of intense exploration in DLT development. This logic is akin to the stored procedures your grandmother may have written for her old-fashioned steam-powered database. The two most pressing questions about this so called “smart contract” layer are (1) where is the proper architectural divide in data control logic versus application logic, and (2) how expressive should that layer be?opscode_head

With regard to expressiveness, Bitcoin started with too much power and has pared back over its evolution. Ethereum sought to provide more expressiveness but control it with economics. In both cases the appropriate divide between application logic and data control logic has been unclear and the allowed ledger operations have been exploited.

8-contrast-smartcontract-txnfamilies_conjoined-768x453Transaction Families create a smaller surface tailored for each domain.

Sawtooth Lake’s Transaction Family architecture is meant to address the questions of architectural boundaries and transaction expressiveness. Rather than trying to create a new language or define the perfect set of opcodes for all domains, Transaction Families decompose the logic problem by domain. If we tease apart the logic layer into two layers we get a set of rules for a domain and a composition layer for creating versatile transactions within that domain.

Transaction families are at once more powerful and more restrictive than other approaches of logic. Transaction Family code is deployed natively within the validator. That embedded validator code defines a data model and a set of updates associated with the model. The DApps (Distributed apps) author can then compose new transaction logic out of the available update methods. We intend that this be a more secure approach than providing all logic for all domains as a single interface to the ledger. Transaction families more tightly bound the code that must be vetted allowing for more tractable analysis. Consider if you will, how the complexity of the DAO code led to this summer’s Ethereum problems.

9-txnfamilydeployment

Sawtooth deployed with two transaction families: Trading and Authorization

Returning again to the consortium ledger, the consortium can define the extent of flexibility on the data model for the domain they participate in. Take for instance some recent work where Sawtooth Lake was used to prototype a bond and settlement market. For this prototype, a transaction family was created specifically to execute only the required bond settlement operations, eliminating the possibility of executing, unallowed, unnecessary, and illegal operations. The consortium can vet and approve a family before it is deployed to the network. The consortium participants can then still differentiate and establish competitive contracts with reduced risk that unwanted operations ensue.

Similarly domains often have services important to that domain which might be inappropriate or unnecessary in others. Again, in the case of bonds, a time service is important to address payment terms for maturity. The granularity of that time is probably coarser than a supply chain  domain focused on delivery of perishable goods like fish, or where the time source for that perishable good is provided by some external authority.

Finally there is a lot of energy surrounding private transactions. The Sawtooth-Core team is experimenting with private transactions using all the tools available including pure cryptographic techniques such as NIZK as well as trusted computing like Intel® SGX. This is an ill-defined space right now. It’s common to hear explicitly contradictory requirements like, the desire to discover assets on the ledger and settle the transfer of assets between parties while at the same time not listing the assets or parties on the ledger. Proposed solutions include recording only opaque identifiers for transactions but not the transactions or the assets themselves. A database that only has transaction IDs but no transactions or assets probably loses a lot of value. However, it’s possible that more interesting solutions exist using computationally expensive means like zero-knowledge relations or using trusted hardware with private enclaves.

Until next time…

I hope this has been an informative look into Sawtooth Lake. We are making a number of significant improvements at the time of this writing from our persistence mechanism up through transaction family API. Next time I’ll bring an update on those activities. Meanwhile you can find the work in progress in our github repo and docs. We are active on slack and there’s always someone around to help ramp a new contributor.

 

* Dan Middleton is an employee of IntelⓇ Corporation. The views expressed here are in the context of his role as an open source maintainer of Sawtooth Lake and do not necessarily represent those of IntelⓇ Corporation.