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Hyperledger Fabric

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By Blog, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are updates on Blockchain Explorer, Fabric, Cello, Iroha and Sawtooth Lake during March.

Blockchain Explorer

  • Latest architecture document is now available on wiki.hyperledger.org
  • Created several Jira tickets required to complete the functionality
  • Completed the initial setup using the latest architecture as proposed in the architecture document

Fabric

  • We published the v1.0-alpha release [1,2,3] of Fabric, Fabric-ca and Fabric-sdk-node. Work now pivots towards testing, bug fixing and further hardening of the release. The maintainers will publish periodic releases as the code further stabilizes.
  • The TSC also approved incubation of a new Fabric SDK for Go. That project will be on-boarded shortly.
  • There is an active proposal to incubate the Fabric-Composer project, but the TSC needs another week of review and discussion. There seems to be interest beyond Fabric that warrants exploration.
  • Planning for a “connect-a-thon” across multiple cloud providers – one that demonstrates that Fabric can be deployed to multiple cloud platforms and integrated into a highly distributed and heterogeneous consortia network – is under way with a number of community members interested in contributing to that effort.

[1] https://github.com/hyperledger/fabric/releases/tag/v1.0.0-alpha

[2] https://github.com/hyperledger/fabric-ca/releases/tag/v1.0.0-alpha

[3] https://github.com/hyperledger/fabric-sdk-node/releases/tag/v1.0.0-alpha

Cello

  • Finished the operational dashboard theme supports, now we support flexible dashboards based on different requirements.
  • Fixed deployment issues from the mailing list and Rocket.Chat, many users show their favorites in Cello.
  • Started implementing fabric 1.0 supports, new features on chaincode lifecycle management are being discussed and will be planed.

Iroha

  • We added a python library and scala library.
  • API is being refactored to match the new flatbuffer data scheme. This should be completed this month.
  • Ametsuchi, the flatbuffer database, is mostly finished. The first version and integration into Iroha should be completed this month.
  • We are currently targeting a v1.0 release of Iroha by the end of April.
  • A very successful hackathon was hosted by the University of Tokyo on March 11-12, where several teams made interesting applications on top of Iroha.

Sawtooth Lake

  • Sawtooth Lake was awarded 2016 Open Source Rookie of the Year by Black Duck software.
    • Previous winners include OpenStack, Ansible, Docker, and Rocket.Chat.
  • New features continue under master (0-8 branch).
    • 0-8 is approaching MVP feature parity with stable (0-7) along with its new capabilities.
    • Recent new features in 0-8 include on-chain configuration and new CLI tools to build transactions including those configuration transactions

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

Happy coding!

Our Incubator’s First Graduate: Hyperledger Fabric

By Blog, Hyperledger Fabric

I’m thrilled to announce that yesterday, Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC) agreed to grant the project team’s request to advance the project’s status from Incubation to Active. As a reminder, we see Hyperledger as an “umbrella” for software developer communities building open source blockchain and related technologies. Fabric falls under that umbrella and is the first of the five Incubator projects to graduate. While Hyperledger Fabric has not yet reached its v1.0 release, the TSC members unanimously agreed that the project has satisfied all of the Incubation Exit Criteria.

The exit criteria by which projects are evaluated in order to graduate from Incubation include legal compliance, community support, test coverage and continuous integration support, documentation, architectural alignment, published releases, and infrastructure support for such things as requirements and defect tracking, code reviews, continuous integration testing and more.

One of the most important of these criteria is the community support criteria. The most successful and sustainable open source projects grow out of a diverse community of contributors, where the loss of any one individual or company can be compensated by the community as a whole. Hyperledger The TSC members agreed that Fabric had made significant progress towards that diversity goal, and given the trajectory, agreed that the criteria was satisfied.

IBM contributed the codebase that, in part, became the basis of the Hyperledger Fabric Incubator. In the year since the project entered incubation, the diversity of contributors on Fabric-related projects has grown from nearly no diversity of contributors to 45% of the contributors – representing individual contributors or developers working for one of nineteen other companies, be they exchanges, banks, large ISVs or start-ups. The project’s 10 maintainers – those individuals tasked with leading the project’s development – represent three different companies and two individual contributors. Hyperledger Fabric has also grown in terms of sub-projects contributed by other community members such as London Stock Exchange, DTCC, Fujitsu, and others. In my experience, few open source projects achieve that level of diversity in so little time.

Hyperledger Fabric has published two releases, the latest of which was their v0.6 release in the fall of 2016. The team is working on finalizing the development of the v1.0-alpha release, which they hope to publish this month.

This is a huge step for the Hyperledger community. The graduation of Fabric represents a milestone for the Hyperledger community as a whole, and I’m eager to see the other projects follow suit. As always, we encourage developers to join our efforts on Fabric, as well as other projects, via github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or the mailing lists. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By Blog, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Chaintool, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are updates on Blockchain Explorer, Cello, Fabric, Sawtooth Lake and Iroha during February.

Blockchain Explorer

We completed the architecture review with the community and incorporated the feedback into the design document. The design document was posted on the “blockchain-explorer” channel on Rocket.Chat. We plan to upload this document to the Hyperledger wiki so that it is permanently available for anyone to review. We are continuing our work to make Explorer compatible with the Fabric 1.0 project.

Sawtooth Lake

New design updates were presented at the Hyperledger hackfest on Feb 1-2 and other Hyperledger forums. Parallel execution and new language support resounded well with the community. In the next month, we will begin work on new demonstration networks exhibiting some of the use cases prototyped using Sawtooth Lake.

Fabric

Fabric continues to press forward to wrapping up feature development for the 1.0 release. The team is preparing a version 1.0 preview initially, followed by an -alpha release by the end of February.

We’ve been bolstering our test frameworks with integration testing that had been developed by IBM for its offerings. We have also been taking a close look at improving documentation to make it more user and application-developer focused.

We had some interesting discussions with the Sawtooth team on integrating PoET into Fabric at the bi-monthly hackfest, which we hope to begin pursuing in the near term and we also continued working with the Sorimitsu team in aligning APIs.

Hyperledger Fabric played a prominent role in the largest blockchain hackathon to date, held in Groningen, Netherlands, Feb 10-12. 55 teams competed in five tracks and two of the five winning teams based their solution on Hyperledger Fabric. The other winning teams used Ethereum or Factom. Roughly half of the 55 teams were also using Hyperledger Fabric. It really was an exciting event and bodes well for the upcoming hackathon in Shanghai in March.

Cello

There are lots of discussions on the Rocket.Chat channel, mostly on documentations and deployment topics. Several Jira tasks were created as the feature roadmap, including refining documentation, supporting fabric 1.0 and supporting other blockchain platforms. We implemented the new dashboard configurations and refined the front-end code. Several deployment enhancement/patch sets are in the works to make Cello more stable.

Iroha

The API has been fixed and currently we are working on porting all the protobuf code to flatbuffers. There are several bugs/memory leaks with flatbuffers still, so we have been working with their project to fix these. We have also been working on getting flatbuffers working with grpc.

We are building a database for flatbuffers, iroha-ametsuchi. Anyone interested in working on it should take a look at the repository: https://github.com/hyperledger/iroha-ametsuchi

At the Hyperledger hackfest in San Francisco, we had an interesting discussion with IBM, where we outlined some ideas for creating inter-ledger transactions between Iroha and Fabric. If anyone in the community is interested in working on this together with us, please tell us on Rocket.Chat/gitter/github issue (https://github.com/hyperledger/iroha/issues/159).

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects and help us shape the future of blockchain. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

Happy coding!