Category

Hyperledger Fabric

Developer Showcase Series: Nathan Aw, NTT DATA

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Quilt

Our Developer Showcase blog series serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Nathan Aw, who is a Digital Advisory & Solutions Manager, of Emerging Technologies & Innovation Practice at NTT DATA.

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

Build software like how we build our houses. Architects draw detailed plans before a brick is laid or a nail is hammered. Programmers and software engineers seldom do – perhaps this is why programs crash more often than houses collapse?

In practical terms, it means… spend a lot of time on writing (thinking) specifications, devising blueprints. For programmers who are building on top of say Hyperledger Fabric, read and understand the protocol specifications. Thereafter write your own specifications for your program. I cannot over emphasize the importance of clarity of thought before one starts building on Hyperledger.

Nathan Aw, NTT Data

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

I am working on Hyperledger Quilt. I got into blockchain purely by chance. Back in college my favorite Computer Science (CS) modules were distributed systems and cryptography (hashing, digital signatures, public-key cryptosystems). When I graduated, I found myself working on middleware (Integration – SOA, AMQP, OSB, etc). When blockchain arrived at the scene, all the stars aligned – I suddenly found my favorite subjects in school and my experience in middleware aligned.  

What project in Hyperledger are you working on? Any new developments to share? Can you sum up your experience with Hyperledger?

Hyperledger Quilt. Amazing community – full of passionate folks who are willing to lend a helping hand. The mailing list is so responsive.

What do you think is most important for Hyperledger to focus on in the next year?

Cross chain interoperability. scalability and security.

As Hyperledger’s incubated projects start maturing and hit 1.0s and beyond, what are the most interesting technologies, apps, or use cases coming out as a result from your perspective?

I find the use cases of diamond supply chain and verifiable IDs for refugees most interesting.

What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

I hope blockchain can help usher in a new age of trustless paradigm. People no longer need to trust organizations but instead trust the software, the cryptographic proof, the process. Blockchain ideally should bring people closer than before – collaboration and cooperation for the betterment of mankind.

Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in 5 years?

I hope to see blockchain deployed in all the major industries, the major sectors and on a global scale.

What is the best piece of developer advice you’ve ever received?

Build Software like how we build our houses!

What technology could you not live without?

Blockchain – To be more specific, Hyperledger. (I mean it!)

 

Nathan Aw Ming Kun is a Digital Advisory & Solutions Manager with NTT Data whose primary focus is on Blockchain technologies and other fast emerging technologies such as Robotics Process Automation (RPA). In his current role, he designs and delivers blockchain solutions for his clients. He is also an active participant in the open source collaborative ecosystem such as the Hyperledger Project, among many others. His passion is to help organisations quickly identify, adopt and scale digital technologies thereby pushing the digital frontier and capturing its full value. Nathan Aw brings with him 6 years of enterprise software and implementation experience from leading companies such as NTT Data, Accenture and Oracle.

Update on the Hyperledger Fabric 1.1 Roadmap

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric

Guest post: Hyperledger Fabric 1.1 release manager, Chris Ferris

One of the questions I am often asked is “Is there a roadmap for Hyperledger Fabric development?” I usually to point people to the Hyperledger Fabric wiki, because for the most part, we try to be pretty transparent about plans for our next release. Our challenge is to try to make the information a bit more visible and accessible.

Since we launched Hyperledger Fabric 1.0.0, the maintainers have published patch releases on a (roughly) monthly basis (v1.0.1 – v1.0.4). We want to continue to deliver monthly patch releases on the 1.0.0 release branch until we release Fabric 1.1.0 sometime in Q1 2018, at which point we will discontinue patch releases for the 1.0.x release branch and start publishing monthly patch releases for 1.1.x release branch.

Our roadmap plan (generally) is to publish approximately one minor release per quarter once we get v1.1.0 finished. We will be also be exploring the adoption of a long-term support (LTS) strategy possibly starting with the v1.2.0 release. What this would mean is that the maintainers would continue to publish patch releases on a designated LTS release for up to a year (initially) afterwards, even if we publish a major or minor release in the interim.

As for which new features we’re tracking in the roadmap for the 1.1.0 release, those can be found in the wiki, as well. The wiki also links to each feature’s JIRA item which tracks the feature development and would typically include any design documents, etc.

We are also tracking a set of experimental features that can be enabled through a re-compile of the Hyperledger Fabric codebase via the wiki. You can generally expect, that these experimental features would be formally supported in the subsequent release (1.2.0 in this case).

We also track the progress of each feature in our next release in our JIRA dashboard (see gadget in the upper left).

The Hyperledger Fabric Maintainers are always interested in feedback (positive and negative) as well as proposals for new features. Anyone can weigh in through one or more of the various communication channels (chat, email, or posting directly to JIRA) and either offer recommendations, or specific proposals.

Meet the TSC: Baohua Yang, Oracle

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric

Back to our blog series that focuses on the motivations and backgrounds of the individuals that make up Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC). The TSC is a group of community-elected developers drawn from a pool of active participants and is a core element of Hyperledger’s Open Governance model. The TSC is responsible for all technical decisions – from which features to add, how to add them and when, among others.

Now let’s introduce the next Hyperledger TSC member, Baohua Yang from Oracle . Let’s see what he had to say about Hyperledger, his role in the TSC and the community!

How are you or your company currently using Hyperledger technologies or how do you plan to?

We are glad to join Hyperledger to help strengthen the underlying infrastructure for blockchain and distributed ledger technologies, especially to enhance the fundamental elements in scalability, security and interoperability. We recently launched Oracle Blockchain Cloud Service, our first blockchain as a platform service, which uses Hyperledger Fabric as its foundation. Leveraging Hyperledger’s technology with our own innovation, we are offering an enterprise-grade blockchain platform that is fully managed by Oracle and provides customers rapid provisioning and simplified operations with built-in monitoring, continuous backup, and point-in-time recovery.

What are the benefits of Hyperledger’s open governance model? 

The open governance model encourages collaboration among leaders and organizations in the industry, and academia to raise prevalent topics. It invites more voices to the community to share opinions, offer idea concepts, and engage to help ensure the proper design and implementation of distributed ledger technology components. Ultimately, this all helps create an active and healthy ecosystem. The more we can invite people into the discussions and development, the greater the chance for wider adoption of this exciting new technology.

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

There are a number of fundamental techniques required for working in blockchain, including distributed system architecture, cryptography and control theory. For anyone interested in exploring a career in blockchain, these are key areas I would recommend you emphasize. But, that being said, it is just as important to keep an open mind, and make an effort to have conversations with others. The only way we get better is through experience, discussions and exploration, so don’t be shy to ask question and try new things. I’d encourage anyone exploring blockchain technology to clone the available code and see what happens!

What’s the biggest struggle or challenge you see Hyperledger having to overcome?

As a joint effort from a number of enterprises and community developers, Hyperledger has been widely adopted in various scenarios. It would be beneficial to the larger Hyperledger community if we were able to collect feedback from previous adoptions in a streamlined process. This would allow us to quickly evolve the technology to meet real-world requirements in finance, supply chain, healthcare, and many other industries. In addition, we would love to help individuals and organizations quickly get started with blockchain technology and Hyperledger through additional education activities such as seminars, training sessions, documentations and more. Blockchain is quickly becoming a critical technology for enterprises and the more we can help others embrace this technology, the stronger the network becomes.

What use cases are you most excited about with Hyperledger and/or blockchain?

We are very excited by the promise that Hyperledger and blockchain technologies, in general, can help improve transactions in many industries, including supply chain and the financial services industry. From improving the traceability food and parts in transport, to improving invoice factoring, blockchain can reduce the total cost of complicated process, and increase the transparency and agility with fewer resource. We are excited to help build this foundation, encourage its growth and help other industries realize the benefits of blockchain.

Meet the TSC: Binh Nguyen, State Street

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric

Back to our blog series that focuses on the motivations and backgrounds of the individuals that make up Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC). The TSC is a group of community-elected developers drawn from a pool of active participants and is a core element of Hyperledger’s Open Governance model. The TSC is responsible for all technical decisions – from which features to add, how to add them and when, among others.

Now let’s introduce the next Hyperledger TSC member, Binh Nguyen from State Street. Let’s see what he had to say about Hyperledger, his role in the TSC and the community!

Describe your current role, background and why you wanted to be a part of the Hyperledger TSC?

I am currently a development director at State Street. I founded Open Blockchain, an open source project, which became the initial codebase of Hyperledger Fabric. I have been the chief architect of Hyperledger Fabric project since genesis and been working passionately with the community on architecture and implementation of Fabric. With my hands-on experience in blockchain, serving the community as a TSC member would allow me to help:

1) guide our technical projects in the right direction

2) involve in building and growing our community

3) learn from other members for my professional and personal development

4) be visible: after all, it’s not about who you know, it’s about who knows you

Binh Nguyen, State Street

What are the benefits of Hyperledger’s open governance model?

I’ve been working on open source projects and learned to appreciate the model, more so for blockchain due to its potential to transform our economy, governance systems and businesses. No one company or organization should have control of the technology but by an open governance, we can ensure it is driven by the interests of the community and humanity. This is, to me, the number one reason why we do what we do in Hyperledger.

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

For those who want to work on shaping blockchain technologies, I would say read up and join Hyperledger; we are always welcome more developers. For those who are looking at building blockchain applications, my advice is to start small with a clear use-case, like bitcoin, a very simple but powerful and elegant application of blockchain. The key is to maximize the network effect between members participating in the blockchain. If you can crystalize that, you have a good blockchain application use-case.

What’s the one thing you hope to accomplish by being a part of Hyperledger’s TSC?

I am grateful for having been elected to TSC. My key objective is to help our community foster leading exemplar of blockchain projects for the good of everyone.

What use cases are you most excited about with Hyperledger and/or blockchain?

I am excited about a lot of blockchain use-cases as this technology can be applied to many different areas, both public and private sectors. From voting records to asset titles management to shipping and logistics. But the set of use cases that I think would have the most immediately impact on everyone of us is finance: from clearing and settlements to capital markets to payments. Financial institutions are facing once-in-a-lifetime disruption, and that’s what I am so excited about blockchain.

 

Developer Showcase: Vishwasrao Salunkhe, Virtusa

By | Blog, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Fabric

Our Developer Showcase blog series serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Vishwasrao Salunkhe, a lead consultant at Virtusa.

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

First start with the basic concepts of Blockchain like Cryptography, Consensus algorithm, Peer to Peer communication, distributed applications. Once you are comfortable I recommend completing the below course to get a high level overview of Blockchain:

https://developer.ibm.com/courses/all/blockchain-essentials/

After this course, you can start playing with Hyperledger Composer Playground and start with existing examples, understand how to define business network, Assets, Participants, Transactions and Events.

You should be familiar with JavaScript. You will be able to define business network in Hyperledger Composer with a JavaScript like Language. Also with help of NodeJS SDK you will be able to talk to the underlining Hyperledger Fabric network. So, only with the JavaScript Language you will be able to develop applications (frontend, backend) around Hyperledger Fabric.

Vishwasrao Salunkhe, Lead Consultant, Virtusa

What project in Hyperledger are you working on? Can you sum up your experience with Hyperledger?

I am working on Hyperledger Fabric. I started working with Fabric 0.6. Once I got the basics of it, I started writing a smart contract in the Go Language. There were few issues I was facing like setting the Hyperledger Fabric network, writing smart contracts in Go (new language for me) and deploying the smart contracts.

Hyperledger Composer is life savior for me, it made my job so easy that I am able to define my business network, assets, transactions etc with a JavaScript like language, deploy locally and test it. Before defining my own business network, I went through all existing demo business network and tried to run them, then changed a few things like assets attributes, participant’s attributes and transactions.

What do you think is most important for Hyperledger to focus on in the next year?

Make developers’ lives easy. Until we have an ecosystem of tools around Hyperledger to design, develop, test, deploy blockchain applications, developers will not be able to move fast with Hyperledger

With Hyperledger Composer, it’s easy to get started, so we need more tools like Composer.

Also, we need to evangelize Hyperledger projects through online talks, webinars, workshops and conferences to spread word.

As Hyperledger’s incubated projects start maturing and hit 1.0s and beyond, what are the most interesting technologies, apps, or use cases coming out as a result from your perspective?

Prior to the 1.0 release of Hyperledger Fabric, people had so many business cases to solve with blockchain but they were not enough tools to get beyond POCs. But with 1.0, people started going beyond POCs or MVPs. Some businesses are already started to use Hyperledger Fabric in production. This is good sign. Also, now new apps, tools frameworks are sprouting up all over.

I would like to see more tools and frameworks come up which will help to speed blockchain implementations. Also, giants like IBM, SAP, Oracle will come up with integrations of their existing applications with Hyperledger.

Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in 5 years?

Internet made people to come close, now blockchain will make businesses to come close

As per hype made in media that blockchain will be mostly used in financial sector, I think not only in finance but fields like supply chain, Insurance, retail and most importantly government sectors will also be covered by blockchain. And Hyperledger will be leading blockchain.

Consider Shipping/Logistics scenario with IoT enabled shipping containers:

Participants: Sender, receiver, freight companies, customs, and banks, Insurance Companies

Assets: Cargo Properties, shipping documents

Business Rule: temperature in containers should always be more than 5 degree.

Sender  =====è  Transporter 1(Ship)      ======è Transporter 2 (Road)  ===è Receiver

                              Insurance Company 1             Insurance Company2   

Blockchain in Logistics/Supply Chain Example (Image Credit)

Goods moved from sender to receiver go through various transportation mode and different insurance companies are involved.

Containers are IoT enabled and data sent from them are stored into Blockchain network. Now when goods are with Transporter 1 and while transporting he does not follow business contract (E.g. Temp of containers should be below 5 degree all time), because of that some containers are not damaged/not useful, then T1 will get penalized based on smart contract and claim processing of these damaged goods will be trigger automatically for Insurance Company 1.

Also, once T1 hands over container to T2, his payment gets triggered

 

VIDEO: Hyperledger, A Greenhouse Incubator for Blockchain Projects

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Chaintool, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

Hyperledger hosts and incubates multiple technology projects, all advancing business blockchain frameworks and modules through open source collaboration. Currently, Hyperledger hosts 6 open source frameworks and 3 open source blockchain tools.

To introduce the concept of blockchain technologies and the Hyperledger organization, we created an explainer video illustrating Hyperledger as a greenhouse incubator for these open source blockchain projects. Intended to serve as a starting point suitable for all audiences wanting to learn about Hyperledger and business blockchain technologies, we hope this 3-minute explainer video will shed light on the following:

1. A distributed ledger is a common system of record with no central authority.

A ledger contains a record of your transactions, along with other transactions in the network. Distributed ledgers are multi-party databases with no central trusted authority. Blockchains can be used to record promises, trades, transactions or simply items we never want to disappear.

2. It’s vitally important to know that your copy of the ledger is identical to everyone else’s

All businesses participating in a commercial ecosystem need a ledger to contain a record of transactions. As a result, across the global market there are ledgers that organizations and individuals alike must trust. Mirrored exactly across all nodes in a given network, distributed ledgers allow everyone in an ecosystem to keep a copy of the common system of record, free from discrepancies. Nothing can ever be erased or edited; parties can only add to the ledger.

3. Hyperledger provides the underlying open source software, on top of which anyone can set up blockchain apps and services to meet business needs.

Hyperledger is incubating and promoting enterprise grade, open source business blockchain technologies, including distributed ledgers, smart contract engines, client libraries, graphical interfaces, utility libraries, and sample applications. Built under technical governance and open collaboration, individual developers, service and solution providers, government associations, corporate members and end users alike are all invited to participate in the development and promotion of these thriving technologies.

4. Hyperledger is a global, cross-industry, collaborative open source consortium.

With 170+ member organizations working across industries and competitive lines, and 400+ code contributors, Hyperledger is the fastest growing consortium in the history of The Linux Foundation’s collaborative projects. Just like you see in this greenhouse, with the help of The Linux Foundation and Hyperledger’s open source approach, everyone does their part to ensure the success of the whole, nurturing these blockchain ecosystems for evolution, expansion and continued growth.

The most renowned leaders in finance, healthcare and supply chain across the globe trust Hyperledger to build their business blockchain technologies. Who will you trust with your trust network?

We encourage developers to join our efforts on Hyperledger via github, Rocket.Chat, the wiki or the mailing lists. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: [email protected].

 Watch and Share the video:

Hyperledger Fabric v1.1.0-preview is now available

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric

Guest post: Hyperledger Fabric 1.1 release managers, Chris Ferris & Dave Enyeart

The maintainers are pleased to announce that the Hyperledger Fabric v1.1.0-preview release has been published. Download the binaries and images here: http://hyperledger-fabric.readthedocs.io/en/v1.1.0-preview/samples.html#download-platform-specific-binaries

The v1.1.0-preview release includes Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Fabric CA, and the SDK for Node.js. Note that we are not yet feature complete for the eventual 1.1 release… that will come with the next published release, v1.1.0-alpha. However, we wanted to get the following functionality published to gain some early community feedback on the following features:

FAB-2231 Node.js Chaincode Support

FAB-5363  Node.js SDK Connection Profile

  • Simplify how your applications connect to Fabric with new connection management capabilities and this Tutorial.

FAB-830 Encryption library for chaincode

  • Encrypt your data using the new chaincode encryption library, see the Example.

FAB-5346 Attribute-based Access Control

FAB-6089 Chaincode APIs to retrieve client identity

  • Obtain transaction submitter identify (certificate, MSP ID, attributes) to make access control decisions using these Chaincode APIs.

FAB-6421 Performance improvements

  • Many performance optimizations to significantly improve transaction throughput and response time.

Additionally, there are the usual bug fixes, documentation and test coverage improvements, UX improvements based on user feedback and changes to address a variety of static scan findings.

Many thanks to the 77 developers representing 13 companies and individuals that contributed to this preview release thus far. We continue to see increasing diversity of contribution from member companies. We encourage all developers to join our efforts on Hyperledfer Fabric and other incubated projects. We welcome any feedback you may have, either via this mailing listJIRA or RocketChat . You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: [email protected]

Happy coding!

Developer Showcase: Chuck Buhecker, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

By | Blog, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

My advice is two-fold.

First, start now. There’s so much to learn. Begin by exploring and understanding the theory behind DLTs; then get your hands dirty with as many examples as you can find. There is a lot of learning involved with the technologies incorporated within Fabric. After working primarily with Java and a few other languages sprinkled in for 18 years, I found YAML files, Golang, and Docker all to be eye-openers.

Second, be patient. Be prepared to do a lot of reading, coding, and experimenting. Even if you have been told by an “expert” in the field that what you are trying to accomplish won’t work, still give it a shot. What you learn along the way is invaluable.

This technology is continuously evolving, and what works in one version may not work in the next. I’ve mostly seen positive outcomes from experimentation. Don’t be tempted to throw your hands up in disgust. Okay, maybe once or twice… but persistence is a virtue!

Chuck Buhecker, Senior application developer, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

I was a latecomer to blockchain and DLT. About a year ago, I started working on a simple AngularJS UI by interacting with Spring REST, and in turn calling Ethereum APIs for a proof of concept (POC) at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Upon completion of our initial POC, we began looking at Hyperledger Fabric v0.6. That’s when I knew there was no turning back. I very much liked working with v0.6 and the documentation served as a solid foundation for me to enhance my understanding of the underlying technologies. Now, with v1.0, I am continuing to expand my skillset.

At the Boston Fed, we’re getting our hands dirty experimenting with DLT to determine applicability, potential benefits, and risks. What better way to learn about the technology than exploring it first hand?  

What project in Hyperledger are you working on? Any new developments to share? Can you sum up your experience with Hyperledger?

The Hyperledger umbrella has so many great sub-projects – I just wish there were more hours in the day to explore them all, reminiscent of the Jakarta Apache days. I have predominantly been working with Fabric sub-umbrella Fabric Core, the Fabric Java SDK, and the Fabric Node SDK, as well as briefly looking into Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Blockchain Explorer, and Hyperledger Fabric-SDK-Go.

I am grateful that the documentation has been well maintained. Hyperledger’s YouTube channel has also been incredibly helpful, especially in regards to the v1.0 chaincode deployment strategy.

As Hyperledger’s incubated projects start maturing and hit 1.0s and beyond, what are the most interesting technologies, apps, or use cases coming out as a result from your perspective?

I see a lot of good implementations that don’t necessarily have a great use case, but from my perspective that is fine. Low-risk, low-use projects using DLT can help develop skills. Then, when there is a need for a mission-critical application, the learning curve isn’t so steep.

I’ve also seen many great third-party applications used in their infancy for Blockchain monitoring, streamlined Blockchain genesis, and Fabric APIs that are less cumbersome and easier to understand than some under the Hyperledger umbrella.

What is the best piece of developer advice you’ve ever received?

Don’t over-engineer to solve a problem. With the wonderful world of dynamic class loading, abstraction, aspecting, and more, it’s easy to develop an overwrought, complex solution for a simple problem.

What technology could you not live without?

If I had to limit it to one technology, I’d say software in general. I don’t know what I’d do with my life if I didn’t write software. Actually, I might be a photographer, but I probably wouldn’t get paid very well because I’m no Ansel Adams!