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Hyperledger Composer

Developer Showcase Series: Aram Barnett, Vergo

By | Blog, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Fabric

Our Developer Showcase blog series serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Aram Barnett, Blockchain Engineer and Managing Partner at Vergo.

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain? 

First, identify why you need blockchain. With all the hype surrounding the technology, it’s easy to think you can capitalize on the hype by sprinkling some blockchain into your app. Without a well-defined plan on how and why you are going to apply it, you are simply wasting your time and money.

Second, I want anyone interested in the technology to commit to learning about the details surrounding the progress blockchain has made rather than just the media hype that surrounds it. According to Gartner Hype Cycle, blockchain is at the peak of the technology hype cycle, and soon blockchain will be transitioning into the “trough of disillusion” where people outside of the development community will think that all of the promises of blockchain are not possible. However, unlike many new technologies on the hype cycle, blockchain will quickly escape the trough of disillusionment and grow exponentially when businesses realize the value of private ledgers. It’s is not easy but with enough dedication and a thorough understanding of the fundamentals, a developer can contribute to the blockchain community and create world changing applications. Third, get familiar Go and Javascript.

Hyperledger Composer, the tool that we use to rapidly build and test business networks, uses Javascript to enable the creation of business actions. Once you dive in the technology, be mindful of the difference between permissioned versus non-permissioned ledgers (a.k.a. public versus private blockchains, respectively) and what they offer. We will soon be releasing our own teaching resources for developers get up to speed on Hyperledger and the best practices on developing blockchain based business networks.

Aram Barnett, Blockchain Engineer and Managing Partner, Vergo

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

I first heard about blockchain when I purchased my first bitcoin in 2011. I was so infatuated with bitcoin I dedicated 3 years of my life to running an alternative asset management fund that exclusively traded cryptocurrencies, learning everything I could about bitcoin and blockchain. I always knew that the real value of bitcoin came from the blockchain and in 2015 I began focusing all of my efforts on developing smart contracts on ethereum and coming up with business use cases.

I am currently working on Vergo, a company I co-founded to create blockchain-based business networks for open source and enterprise use.We’re working to make existing corporations more efficient by cutting excess expense associated with business transactions. To further support this community, we are open-sourcing some of our business logic to help other developers learn about this unique technology. We believe that this technology will allow developers to create turnkey businesses in which open-source business logic is easily deployable. This will increase access to entrepreneurship around the globe and empower people to start their own businesses.

More importantly, we believe we have the ethical responsibility to help transition the world to this new era in a responsible manner in which participants understand the consequences of enhanced business network efficiency and automation. We strive to ride the new wave of technological innovation by giving equal attention to corporate efficiency and social well-being.

If you look at  the Gartner Hype Cycle, mentioned earlier, blockchain is at the peak of public hype about its potential. This new wave of technology is scary to some and at peak hype it can seem like anything is possible. I made the choice to ride the blockchain wave. Since I first got involved with bitcoin and subsequently blockchain in 2011, I knew that it would be a promising technology that needs to be developed and implemented globally. We are currently at peak hype, so public interest will decline in the next few years. However, the underlying technology will still be revolutionary and over time the corporate sector will realize how truly valuable it is to their networks.

As Hyperledger’s incubated projects start maturing and hit 1.0s and beyond, what are the most interesting technologies, apps, or use cases coming out as a result from your perspective?

The most interesting project to come out of is Hyperledger Fabric. We are excited about the progress of Fabric 1.0 and what it has to offer to large and medium enterprises. I met with the lead developers at the Hyperledger hackfest in Washington DC to learn more about Fabric and help contribute to the project. Vergo is very interested in this because we see the long-term impact that Fabric will have on how companies deploy blockchain solutions. We are very excited to be building applications and business logic on top of the Fabric ledger that these talented developers have built. We are currently discussing the possibility of cooperation between Vergo and some IBMers to display our business applications running on the IBM z mainframe. Another exciting application called Hyperledger Composer, the application we use to model, build, and test our business networks very quickly using their  business development language. After speaking with  Simon Stone, one of the maintainers of Hyperledger Composer, we are very excited for the future of Composer as a development tool and the services they plan to integrate into it.

What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

Blockchain has the ability to solve a lot of problems. The ability to capture the nature of “businesses” and their “workers” and digitizing those relationships could lead to efficiency increases across almost every industry.

I think what I am most interested in, in regards to public-facing blockchain solutions, is the possibility of interoperability between chains and the assignment of an identity to every person. For instance, imagine from the very day you are born you were assigned a bank account, a verified identity and trackable health records all stored on a government ledger. From here, your financials, health records, and identity would be immutable and secure and would follow you over the course of your life. The interoperability between your identity and your financial records, for example, would verify you exist while not disclosing your personal data every time you make a transaction. By solving the problem of identity, many other possible solutions arise.

Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in 5 years?

Let me answer your question with another question: Where do I not see it?

Blockchain-based business networks are inevitable. I think there will be varied solutions for individual businesses and sectors that provide accessible solutions to problems associated with the analysis of big data and efficiency of transactions. Blockchain will be easier to collect and analyze data, which will enhance our understanding of business practices and markets.

Additionally, I hope that turnkey businesses will emerge across the world using open source logic developed out of the Hyperledger framework. The ability to replicate businesses with extreme ease will increase access to opportunities for economically disadvantaged peoples. I hope that the pool of open source logic is such that it allows anyone with enough emotional intelligence and work-ethic to provide a valuable product to a customer even without understanding underlying business logic.

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are June updates on Hyperledger projects.

Hyperledger Burrow

  • Implementation of dynamic memory on the Ethereum Virtual Machine
  • New type-safe Application Binary Interface package for translating data to Ethereum contracts into packed Ethereum bytes for transaction formulation (logical requirement for Ethereum chain; but all package implementations thus far have been GPLv3 licensed, as such in tooling code not included in Burrow; this new package will be able to go into Hyperledger Burrow under Apache license)
  • Alpha of batching client for new API with high transaction throughput (> 400 tx/s)
  • Various bug fixes
  • First prototype of Burrow EVM to run as transaction processor on Hyperledger Sawtooth Ledger

Hyperledger Cello

  • A user dashboard was added to support seeing blockchain status and chaincodes.
  • The k8s support features was started with intern students; Upgrade swarm support to latest version (17.04).
  • Refine the installation scripts to support multi-os-distributions.
  • Fabric 1.0-* supported scripts was added.

Hyperledger Composer

  • We completed all rebranding activities as part of the move to Hyperledger – we moved to the Hyperledger Docker Hub organization, and renamed the Yeoman generator module.
  • We added support for modelling and publishing events from a transaction processor function, allowing client applications and existing systems to respond to events from a deployed business network.
  • We made extensive changes to our new user and getting started documentation, including reworked installation guides and tutorials which are available in the docs: https://hyperledger.github.io/composer/introduction/introduction.html
  • We delivered a set of nodes for Node-RED which allow developers to easily build outbound and inbound integration between a deployed business network and external system using IoT/MQTT, WebSockets, TCP, etc.
  • We added experimental support for invoking external HTTP APIs from within a transaction processor function, allowing external data such as share prices to be used within business logic.
  • We are currently focusing on delivering Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 beta support, complex query support (by exploiting CouchDB), and a new vehicle lifecycle demo that shows off the power of Composer.

Hyperledger Explorer

  • No major updates to report this month.

Hyperledger Fabric

  • Hyperledger Fabric v1.0.0-beta was released, and the maintainers plan on weekly releases until we have a demonstrably stable release candidate. We hope to be able to release in late July if all goes well.
  • The project’s engineers have significantly increased test coverage (+82%) and reduced its open defect count (~130 -> 22) since the 1.0.0-alpha2 release. It has been encouraging to see the diversity of contributions. It the past month alone, we have had contributions from 73 individuals representing 12 companies (including IBM) and 12 unaffiliated individuals.
  • The project is seeing a steadily increasing stream of downloads of the milestone releases with global coverage (US, Brazil, China, India, UK, Germany, France, Croatia, Russia, Japan, Indonesia, Australia and even Pakistan). There is an abundance of interest in China, India and Japan, nearly rivaling the US.
  • The remaining focus is on improving the documentation, continuing to test and fix bugs, and complete the various license, crypto-export and security scans.

Hyperledger Indy

  • No major updates to report this month.

Hyperledger Iroha

  • No major updates to report this month.

Hyperledger Sawtooth

  • Graduated to Active status! 
  • Project page new and improved, now with demo networks: https://www.hyperledger.org/projects/sawtooth
  • Collaborating with Hyperledger Burrow to integrate EVM with Sawtooth.
  • Added “State Delta Subscriptions” for pub/sub feature
  • Added Supply Chain Transaction Family
  • Providing Hyperledger Sawtooth features for Open Music Initiative Summer Lab.
  • Completed Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative badge requirements.

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: [email protected].

Happy coding!

 

(6.27.17) InfoQ: Building a Blockchain PoC in Ten Minutes Using Hyperledger Composer

By | Hyperledger Composer, News

People generally first hear about blockchain through cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, the peer-to-peer payment system which is largely unregulated and resistant to single points of control. In recent years however, blockchain – the distributed ledger technology that underpins Bitcoin – has been increasingly adopted by businesses for a wider range of uses beyond digital currencies. In this article, I will take you through what businesses look for when considering blockchain’s role in their organization and how the Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger Composer can help application developers easily create compelling blockchain solutions for the enterprise.

More here.

Consensus 2017 is a Wrap!

By | Events, Finance, Healthcare, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

The Hyperledger team (and 40 of our members!) spent a good amount of time in New York for CoinDesk’s annual Consensus conference last week. It was a great event with tons of excitement and enthusiasm around blockchain and its many applications. Attendees were from all walks of life – from developers to architects to financial services professionals to healthcare specialists to investors – all trying to better understand the best and most practical use cases of the technology.
The event kicked off the weekend before with the Building Blocks Hackathon at 30 Rockefeller where many of the world’s top blockchain developers vied to build the next killer smart contract app. Participants could build on top of any blockchain protocol: bitcoin, Ethereum, Hyperledger or otherwise. And through various sponsor challenges, they were encouraged to leverage the software and support made available by our world-class mentors in order to deliver projects.

Hyperledger was a sponsor of the event. The Hashed Health development team ended up winning the Hyperledger challenge, which was to create a game using any of the Hyperledger frameworks

(Winning team of the Hyperledger hackathon challenge and Hyperledger Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf)

Jonathan Levi, an active Hyperledger community member and the founder of HACERA, won 2 hackathon challenges using Hyperledger technology. They won the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance challenge and they were one of the winners of the Microsoft challenge. They called their solution Dutchess – a secure decentralized Chess on the blockchain that allows players to use ETH to pay for an unfair advantage in a sealed-bid Dutch auction. The entry highlighted Jonathan’s and HACERA’s approach of integrating multiple permissioned & public chains.

Dutchess incorporated:

  • Public Ethereum accounts used to transfer money to a sealed-bid Dutch auction
  • Confidential transactions using Solidity on Quorum, deployed on Microsoft Azure
  • A permissioned and public identity chain (Sovrin) for registering identity tokens
  • Hyperledger Indy for implementing secure verifiable claims
  • Hyperledger Sawtooth for transaction processing and validation

The result was a mini HACERA-like workflow that provided secure, auditable, privacy preserving, that prevents impersonation, relying on self-sovereign identity and offers a non-repudiation guarantee – with a playable fun game of Chess on a blockchain.

Early Monday, the Hyperledger team then set up shop on the 6th floor of the Marriott Marquis in Times Square. Crowds of attendees stopped by each day to learn more about the technology.  

 

At the booth several member companies gave demos on different Hyperledger projects including Hyperledger Fabric and Hyperledger Iroha. Cloudsoft demonstrated Deploying Hyperledger Fabric on Kubernetes with Cloudsoft AMP. IBM showed Connect a Cloud, connecting organizations together on Hyperledger Fabric using hosted cloud providers of choice. Soramitsu ran a KYC/user identity demo of Hyperledger Iroha/Android app and video, and Byacco, a local digital currency currently in use at University of Aizu in Fukushima, Japan. IntellectEU together with their customer Telindus (Proximus Group) explained streamlined asset transactions through reconciliation, matching and resolution among multiple parties.

Hyperledger also hosted a Roundtable on Monday on its distributed ledger technologies, Hyperledger Sawtooth and Hyperledger Iroha, each technology had end users speak to their different use cases. Kelly Olsen from Intel spoke to Sawtooth and his user, Pokitdok CTO, Ted Tanner weighed in on how they are utilizing Sawtooth in their healthcare blockchain solution. Makoto Takemiya, CEO, co-founder, Soramitsu discussed Hyperledger Iroha as a blockchain framework for mobile applications and Soichiro Takagi, from the Center for Global Communications (GLOCOM), International University of Japan shared his experience with the technology.

(Hyperledger roundtable participants: Makoto Takemiya, Soichiro Takagi, Kelly Olsen & Ted Tanner)

In addition to the robust line-up of Hyperledger activities in the main Consensus program and on the show floor, Hyperledger hosted a series of talks that ran all day Monday and Tuesday in the Hyperledger Mini Summit room. Attendees interested in how to best collaborate and get involved in the Hyperledger initiatives and learn where they can provide the most value had their bases covered in Monday’s “Meet the Hyperledger community” sessions. Speakers included the new technical staff, and diverse representation from the Technical Steering and Marketing committees, Governing Board, Identity Working Group and our fearless leader, Brian Behlendorf, Hyperledger’s executive director.

In Tuesday’s Hyperledger Mini Summit sessions, members dove a bit deeper into the impact of blockchain technologies on their businesses with field reports on how they are using Hyperledger to solve their business objectives. Attendees heard technical insights from Norbloc on the KYC process, IntellectEU together with their customer Telindus (Proximus Group) on streamlined asset transactions, as well as Cloudsoft on deploying and managing global blockchain networks.

Our members reinforced that blockchain is not only impacting business on a global scale, but also across industries through blockchain talks from Huawei on telecom, Daimler on the industrial enterprise, Deloitte on regulation, Energy Blockchain Labs on reversing China carbon emissions, and a panel of speakers from Accenture, BanQu and Leading Directions on blockchain for good applications.

Hyperledger hosted three different panels on Tuesday moderated by Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf and Security Maven, Dave Huseby. Those panels were “The Role of Open Source in Blockchain,” “Blockchain in the Wild, PoCs, Pilots & Deployments” and “Security, Privacy and the Enterprise Blockchain.”

(The Role of Open Source in Blockchain panelists: Dan Middleton, Intel, Casey Kuhlman, Monax, Makoto Takemiya, Soramitsu & Amber Baldet, J.P. Morgan)

 

(Blockchain in the Wild, PoCs, Pilots & Deployments panelists: Jesse Chenard, MonetaGo, Ashwin Kumar, Deutsche Boerse, Ram Komarraju, CLS Group, Corey Todaro, Hashed Health & David Treat, Accenture)

The panels were very well attended and there was great discussion on all three topics. It was most interesting that identity on the blockchain turned out to be the main topic of conversation during the security and privacy panel. And on that note, we’re excited with Hyperledger Indy just recently getting accepted into incubation under Hyperledger. Indy provides tools, libraries, and reusable components for providing digital identities rooted on blockchains.

(Security, Privacy and the Enterprise Blockchain panelists: Justin Newton, Netki, Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation, Jeff Garzik, Bloq & Astyanax Kanakakis, Norbloc)

We ended Consensus with a member party atop a NYC hotel rooftop. It was such a pleasure to see everyone and we are extremely grateful for all the support our community has provided around this event and overall. We’re looking forward to next year’s event – we hope that you can join us!
For those interested in additional information about Hyperledger technologies please reach out to: [email protected] As always, we encourage developers to join our efforts via GitHub, Rocket.Chat the wiki or the mailing lists. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter.

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are May updates on Hyperledger projects.

Hyperledger Explorer

  • We are currently understanding the Node SDK provided by Hyperledger Fabric
  • Created basic project setup with front end using popular react.js framework
  • Added two new developers and are busy getting them up to speed on contributing to Hyperledger Explorer

Hyperledger Burrow

  • We moved and renamed former eris-db v0.16 into Hyperledger Burrow v0.16 (logistics) to initiate Hyperledger Burrow
    • We upgraded Tendermint v0.8.0 (Burrow v0.16) to Tendermint v0.9.2 (on develop Burrow v0.17)
    • Initial design work completed on user interaction with Hyperledger Burrow’s EVM from within Hyperledger family, specifically looking at Hyperledger Composer for UI/UX (replacing monax/legacy-contracts.js) and Hyperledger Indy for identity
  • Started collaboration with Hyperledger Sawtooth to use Hyperledger Burrow’s EVM as a transaction processor on the Hyperledger Sawtooth platform

Hyperledger Cello

  • Added new user-dashboard to support multi-tenant
  • K8s support has been discussed and will make documentation on jira
  • Hyperledger Fabric 1.0 support script are submitted
  • Summer intern students were trained to get familiar with the project

Hyperledger Composer

  • Made great progress with our move to Hyperledger:
    • Moved all source code and builds into GitHub and Travis CI under the Hyperledger organization
    • Moved the main website and documentation to https://hyperledger.github.io/composer
    • Substantial rebranding effort of main website, documentation, and playground
  • Delivered support for deploying Hyperledger Composer to Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 alpha:
    • New version of the getting started guide and related documentation
    • Continuing to keep in step with the latest Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 changes
  • Delivered connection profile and identity management support in the playground:
    • Use connection profiles to connect to Hyperledger Fabric v0.6 and v1.0.
    • Use identity management to switch between different Blockchain identities.
    • Removed and deprecated the old, superseded UI
  • Upgraded the Angular generator to generate Angular 4 applications.
  • Began work on being able to model, publish, and subscribe to business events.

Hyperledger Fabric

  • We agreed to a feature/code freeze at the Hackfest in DC, and selected co-release managers for the v1.0 release: Chris Ferris (IBM) and Jonathan Levi (Hacera).
  • At the hackfest, we also discussed and agreed on some changes to the development process proposed by Dave Huseby, which we will implement as a function of creating the release branch for v1.0.0-alpha2.
  • The TL;DR: of the proposal is that we will manage change through feature branches that will be merged into a development branch to undergo the full gauntlet of testing, and reverted if they still need work. Once the development branch has merged the set of features agreed for a release, the develop branch will be fast forward merged into the release branch (also the master branch), tested once more, and then published. The release/master branch which will always have the most recent stable release as the default on GitHub (as opposed to the head of development as is the case today).
  • Hyperledger Fabric added three new maintainers to help keep reviews up with the pace of change requests.
  • The rate of bug fixing has consistently outpaced reporting for the past 3 weeks, with in excess of 50 defects resolved per week.
  • The unit test coverage has seen steady improvement, now more than 70% (it had been 61%) with many key areas of the code at 100%. The integration test framework is taking shape and we expect to have regular testing (daily, performance/scale and long running) operational shortly.
  • Maintainers cut a v1.0.0-alpha2 release the week of May 8

Hyperledger Indy

  • Hyperledger Indy team is currently planning Jira migration from Sovrin to Hyperledger and working on configuration post-Jira Upgrade
  • Planning migration of code from Sovrin GitHub to Hyperledger GitHub
  • The team is identifying participants for Healthcare, Performance and Scaling WGs as well as collaborators for Hyperledger Burrow and Hyperledger Composer

Hyperledger Iroha

Hyperledger Sawtooth

  • Hyperledger Sawtooth graduated to Active status, announced at Consensus
  • Good hacking at the DC Hackfest, getting started integrating the Hyperledger Burrow EVM and Hyperledger Sawtooth.
  • On track for 0.8 feature complete (one condition for 1.0 release this summer).
    • Updated PoET to Hyperledger Sawtooth 0.8 architecture
    • Implemented PoET Z, C, & K admission policies
    • Threaded peering code
    • Added docker compose features and docs
    • Automated binary package and docker images
    • Improved serial scheduler to take advantage of new context manager functionality
    • Implemented client-side Javascript SDK (Transaction/Batch creation)
    • Implemented Go SDK
    • C++ SDK in progress

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: [email protected].

Happy coding!

 

Hyperledger Hyderabad Meetup Explores Blockchain’s Applicability to Healthcare

By | Blog, Healthcare, Hyperledger Composer

Guest post: Sai Tejo Kiran E, Co-organizer, Hyperledger Hyderabad Meetup

The Hyperledger Hyderabad Meetup has been growing! Recently, we decided to have a combination of tech sessions and workshops combined with talks from meetup members who have implemented proof of concepts and built prototypes using Hyperledger. Blockchain is a revolutionary technology with the potential to disrupt the way things are currently functioning in many industries from financial services, to healthcare to technology. Specific to healthcare, blockchain has the potential to improve efficiency leading to massive cost reduction.

To give some perspective about the stakes at play for pharma companies, for every 10,000 molecules, just one of them becomes a drug. It takes about 10 years from the time a patent is awarded to the time the drug comes to the market. The process is marred by regulations, audit and compliance, data management etc. A patent is awarded for 20 years, so the scope for monetization is limited to about 8 years until it moves to the generics market and starts being sold it at low rates. So, in this context, if we can reduce the inefficiency in the go to market strategy and reduce the 12 years to 4-5 years, it is a big deal. Eventually it will lead to reduction in cost of the medicine.

A few weeks ago we had an Enterprise Architect from a major international pharma giant in Hyderabad give a talk pertaining to blockchain use cases in the healthcare sector. Below are specific use cases where the benefits of blockchain technology could help improve healthcare he discussed:

  1. Consent management

A patient could provide his medical history into the blockchain, enrich it with the EHR and make it accessible as and when required to the right stakeholders. Consent management using blockchain was a large topic at our last meetup. Enriching the EHR with personal health records from fitness devices/trackers and making it accessible to the doctors with the consent of the patient makes a case for better diagnosis of symptoms. Blockchain could give the control and meditation of data to the true actor, the owner of the data (patients in this case).

  1. Efficiency driving

Blockchain could be used for inter-organizational record keeping (audit and compliance) since a lot of data movement happens between regulators, manufacturers, regulators etc. Data can go stale since a copy is maintained independently by all the players. Tracking the integrity of the content is an important aspect.

  1. Data Integrity and Traceability

Imagine a clinical trial is going on and a patient is going to get some analysis done. The test data comes out as a lab report. Every lab report is maintained in a system managed by the pharma company. All the lab reports data is collated and is sent to the regulatory authorities to communicate the outcome. As part of audit and compliance, the authorities are not confident if the data is being tampered or not which might lead to mistrust. So the auditors visit the premises and validate the data. Blockchain could be a potential solution to improve this process. Every time a vital is collected and the data is taken can we create a hash and store it in the blockchain. Do this for all the patients. Share this with the authorities and send it with link to the hashes on the blockchain. If the data is being modified, then the hashes would not match which indicates discrepancy.

The other benefit which is an outcome of this process is that the data movement, access and ledger maintenance across lab Systems becomes smoother. This in turn will also lead to a process upgrade to the submission system for patent approval in addition to the Legal hold system on the data in case of disputes.

  1. Supply chain tracking of drugs

Blockchain based track and trace, improves provenance and traceability across the supply chain. Counterfeit medicine is a big issue pharma companies face in their everyday operations since there are many stakeholders involved in the supply chain. So the problem statement at hand is,“Can we track the medicine from the source to the destination, working with all the stakeholders using blockchain?” Recall of drugs and avoiding counterfeit drugs from entering into legit marketplaces will help in reducing the losses and improving service delivery to the end customer. Patient access programs also form a very important business proposition for pharma companies. Most of the companies conduct drives around vaccination programs and administer drugs free of cost. They are not running well due to lot of practical reasons involving multiple mediators. Blockchain could be used to maintain the entire supply chain in healthcare.

How is Hyperledger helping?

One of Hyperledger’s incubated projects, Hyperledger Composer, offers a set of APIs, a modeling language and a programming model to quickly define and deploy business networks and applications that allow participants to send transactions that exchange assets. It is more like an IDE tool like Eclipse, but specific to Hyperledger. It is useful for developers since they need to work with models and visuals and let the tool manage the underlying smart contracts and networks. Hyperledger Composer uses extensive, familiar and open development toolset. It is very useful for solution developers and looks at blockchain through three aspects:

  •         Participants – patients, doctors, insurance companies etc.
  •         Assets – patient data, stakeholder data etc.
  •         Transactions – Business rules which govern the exchange of assets

Conclusion

Blockchain technology has the potential to transform healthcare, placing the patient at the center of the healthcare ecosystem and increasing the privacy and interoperability of health data. This technology could provide a new model for health information exchanges (HIE) by making electronic medical records more secure by removing the need for multiple intermediaries.

With greater transparency, trust, and access to data, stakeholders can then also garner insights for better safety, effectiveness, quality, and security of drugs, vaccines, and medical devices. The promise of blockchain has widespread implications for stakeholders in the healthcare ecosystem. While it is not a solution for all the health care technology issues, this new, rapidly evolving field provides fertile ground for experimentation, investment, and proof-of-concept testing showing good promise in terms of impact.

For those interested particularly in healthcare and blockchain, please join the Hyperledger Healthcare Working Group here. You can also plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. Be sure to follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: [email protected]