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Hyperledger Chaintool

ABCs of Open Governance

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Chaintool, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

Today, most people understand the concept of Open Source – certainly we expect most readers of this blog understand it. View the code, use the code, copy the code, change the code, and, depending on the license, contribute back changes or not.

What many people don’t get, and something we here at Hyperledger and The Linux Foundation pride ourselves on doing well, is Open Governance.

The Linux Foundation, and all of our 60+ open source projects, are not-for-profits building the greatest shared R&D investment in history. Open Governance is central to this promise.

Open Governance means that technical decisions -– which features to add, how to add them and when, among others – for a given Open Source project or projects are made by a group of community-elected developers drawn from a pool of active participants. It is as close to the ideal of pure technical meritocracy as one can get and we strive continuously to reach that ideal.

Hyperledger recently concluded the 2017-2018 Technical Steering Committee (TSC) election, and so we thought it an opportune time to explain the ABCs of Open Governance. Please note that this is one Open Governance implementation and clearly not the only way to do it, but rather one proven and effective way.

What does the Hyperledger TSC do?

The TSC charter spells out the group’s responsibilities.

The TL;DR is that the TSC is the ultimate authority on technical decisions. This includes which new projects are admitted to Hyperledger , which current projects graduate from Incubation to Active , and the rules by which each Hyperledger project will operate.

Participation in Hyperledger through becoming a Contributor and/or Maintainer is open to anyone.
Hyperledger Charter Section 4C

As a developer or maintainer, this translates into one thing: trust. You know how decisions will be made and the process by which people will be selected to make these decisions. Hyperledger is vendor-neutral and technical contributions are based on meritocracy. We will always remain immune to the commercial interests of any single company.

The TSC election process consists of three simple steps:

  1. Identification of eligible participants
  2. Nominations
  3. Voting

Who is really eligible to be on the TSC?

The charter spells out that the TSC voting members shall consist of eleven (11) elected Contributors or Maintainers chosen by the Active Contributors.

So, how do you determine an active contributor, you may ask? As part of the current election, every project maintainer and Working Group leader was asked to provide a list of all the people that have contributed to their work in the past year. In addition, a review of all code and other contributions was conducted.

This year, 424 active contributors were identified as eligible to participate in the TSC election process.

Bring It (your nomination that is)

The Linux Foundation maintains an expert staff with decades of combined experience managing the operations of large scale, Openly Governed Open Source projects.

For Hyperledger, the Sr. Program Manager Todd Benzies ensures the trains run on time.

Below is Todd’s email calling for TSC nominations:

This nominating process produced 32 candidates for the 11 TSC spots. These 32 come from 20 different organizations, across a spectrum of industries, from technology vendors to foundations to end users from a variety of industries. They include people who work at Hyperledger members and non-members and some are standing as individuals.

A policy whose importance is hard to overstate is that anyone elected to a seat on the TSC is elected as a person unbound to the company for which they presently work. Should any TSC member during their tenure leave an employer for another, this would have zero impact on their standing as member of the Hyperledger TSC.

Cast your vote

Here is Todd’s email sent to the same list announcing the nominees and opening voting.

The arrow highlights one of the things that we’ve learned along the way as a trick to the trade of running open governance well. The voting system has to be unquestionably secure and fair (something by now truly everyone can relate to…).

We use the Condorcet Internet Voting System to safeguard the privacy of this election and voting process. CIVS can only be accessed by authorized voters, who receive a unique URL tied to their email address. Voters rank a set of possible choices and individual voter rankings are combined into an anonymous overall ranking of the choices. One vote is allowed per IP address.

Results

This process yields a fairly and openly-elected technical decision making body pulled from the community that cares about Hyperledger. We know they care not because they said so, not because the company they work for has joined Hyperledger, but because they invested their time to make contributions to Hyperledger code bases. Or, as Hyperledger Executive Director Brian Behlendorf says, “it’s a do -ocracy.”

Meet the New Hyperledger TSC (listed in alphabetical order)

Arnaud Le Hors
Baohua Yang
Binh Nguyen
Christopher Ferris
Dan Middleton
Greg Haskins
Hart Montgomery
Jonathan Levi (new)
Kelly Olson (new)
Mic Bowman
Nathan George (new)

If you’re interested in learning more about the Hyperledger TSC and its elected members, we’ll be kicking off a “Meet the TSC” blog series in the coming weeks. Be sure to look out for it!

You can plug into the community at github , Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list .

Hyperledger Adds Seven New Members

By | Announcements, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Chaintool, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

The Linux Foundation’s open blockchain initiative grows to 135 members

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – (April 26, 2017) Hyperledger, a collaborative cross-industry effort created to advance blockchain technology, announced today that seven new members have joined the project to help create an open standard for distributed ledgers for a new generation of transactional applications.

“This is a very exciting time with world class global organizations joining Hyperledger nearly every week,” said Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director, Hyperledger. “The blockchain technology community still has many challenges to solve, and many different possible approaches to solving them. Hyperledger’s open collaboration is key to fostering this growing community and is fundamentally important to getting innovative ideas into production-quality code this year.”

Hyperledger aims to enable organizations to build robust, industry-specific applications, platforms and hardware systems to support their individual business transactions by creating an enterprise grade, open source distributed ledger framework and code base. It is a global collaboration including leaders in finance, banking, IoT, supply chain, manufacturing and technology. The latest members include: CollectorIQ Inc., Korea Exchange, Shanghai Onechain Information Technology, Shenzhen Forms Syntron Information, The State of Illinois, The Netherlands Organization for applied scientific research (TNO) and 1worldblockchain.

New member quotes:

CollectorIQ Inc.

“CollectorIQ’s data and analytics platform aims to unlock liquidity in the $6 trillion global fine art and collectibles market,” said Christopher E. Vroom, CFA / CEO / CIQ of CollectorIQ Inc. “We’ve assembled the world’s largest public and private market dataset, which is the first step towards greater transparency and, ultimately, higher transaction velocity. The distributed ledger promises to increase trust and veracity of and in asset authenticity which we view as a fundamental requirement for broad-based participation. Over the next ten years, we expect blockchain strategies to drive an incremental $200 billion in sales activity in this vertical. We’re thrilled to be a part of Hyperledger and hope that we can meaningfully contribute to open-source innovation within this growing network of like-minded entrepreneurs.”

Korea Exchange

“Joining Hyperledger will open the gateway to the blockchain technology for the Korean capital market,” said Hong Hee Shin, CIO of the Korea Exchange. “As it has strived to transform the traditional financial industry into innovative business, the Korea Exchange will keep driving the Korean capital market to adopt and develop distributed ledger technology that will benefit all market participants and investors. The collaboration with Hyperledger and member firms will accelerate its effort to reach the goal.”

Shanghai Onechain Information Technology

“Onechain technology, a financial technology company in China, is excited to have joined Hyperledger as an open source initiative that promotes blockchain digital technology and transaction verification,” Mr. George Zhou, the general manager of Onechain technology. “Members can cooperate with each other to build an open platform and meet the needs of different industries from multiple use cases and streamline business processes. The success of joining, not only marks that Onechain technology has gained further acceptance in the field of blockchain, but also provides a good opportunity for us to cooperate with other members. And our goal is to become the blockchain integrated application solutions expert in the future.”

Shenzhen Forms Syntron Information

“Since its inception in 2003, Forms Syntron has been focusing on providing comprehensive IT services for the banking industry,” said Frank Chow, chairman of Forms Syntron. “We believe blockchain will take an important position in the banking industry. Being a member of Hyperledger will facilitate our blockchain technology, accelerate our development of fintech applications, and also promote the implementation of innovative blockchain applications for the banking industry.”

1worldblockchain

“The recent partnership between 1worldblockchain.com and the Hyperledger global community is a big step toward ensuring workable Blockchain standards, whilst staying true to the theme of DLT open source,” said Edward Ng, CEO of 1worldblockchain.com (1WB). “Our goal is to provide a robust Blockchain platform and business solutions development to facilitate an even better operational environment for the Fintech industry.  The Fintech operating environment needs industry standardized stability in order for it to move forward at an optimal and sustainable pace, as it replaces the outmoded, slow and inconvenient traditional X-border wire transfers systems. We at 1worldblockchain are looking forward to supporting the goodwill and contributing to the success of Hyperledger as part of The Linux Foundation.”

To see a full list of member companies, visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/about/members. If you’re interested in joining Hyperledger as a member company, please visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/about/join

About Hyperledger

Hyperledger is an open source collaborative effort created to advance blockchain technology by addressing important features for a cross-industry open standard for distributed ledgers. It is a global collaboration including leaders in finance, banking, Internet of Things, supply chains, manufacturing and Technology. The Linux Foundation hosts Hyperledger as a Collaborative Project under the foundation. To learn more, visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/.

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By | Blog, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Chaintool, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are updates on Blockchain Explorer, Cello, Fabric, Sawtooth Lake and Iroha during February.

Blockchain Explorer

We completed the architecture review with the community and incorporated the feedback into the design document. The design document was posted on the “blockchain-explorer” channel on Rocket.Chat. We plan to upload this document to the Hyperledger wiki so that it is permanently available for anyone to review. We are continuing our work to make Explorer compatible with the Fabric 1.0 project.

Sawtooth Lake

New design updates were presented at the Hyperledger hackfest on Feb 1-2 and other Hyperledger forums. Parallel execution and new language support resounded well with the community. In the next month, we will begin work on new demonstration networks exhibiting some of the use cases prototyped using Sawtooth Lake.

Fabric

Fabric continues to press forward to wrapping up feature development for the 1.0 release. The team is preparing a version 1.0 preview initially, followed by an -alpha release by the end of February.

We’ve been bolstering our test frameworks with integration testing that had been developed by IBM for its offerings. We have also been taking a close look at improving documentation to make it more user and application-developer focused.

We had some interesting discussions with the Sawtooth team on integrating PoET into Fabric at the bi-monthly hackfest, which we hope to begin pursuing in the near term and we also continued working with the Sorimitsu team in aligning APIs.

Hyperledger Fabric played a prominent role in the largest blockchain hackathon to date, held in Groningen, Netherlands, Feb 10-12. 55 teams competed in five tracks and two of the five winning teams based their solution on Hyperledger Fabric. The other winning teams used Ethereum or Factom. Roughly half of the 55 teams were also using Hyperledger Fabric. It really was an exciting event and bodes well for the upcoming hackathon in Shanghai in March.

Cello

There are lots of discussions on the Rocket.Chat channel, mostly on documentations and deployment topics. Several Jira tasks were created as the feature roadmap, including refining documentation, supporting fabric 1.0 and supporting other blockchain platforms. We implemented the new dashboard configurations and refined the front-end code. Several deployment enhancement/patch sets are in the works to make Cello more stable.

Iroha

The API has been fixed and currently we are working on porting all the protobuf code to flatbuffers. There are several bugs/memory leaks with flatbuffers still, so we have been working with their project to fix these. We have also been working on getting flatbuffers working with grpc.

We are building a database for flatbuffers, iroha-ametsuchi. Anyone interested in working on it should take a look at the repository: https://github.com/hyperledger/iroha-ametsuchi

At the Hyperledger hackfest in San Francisco, we had an interesting discussion with IBM, where we outlined some ideas for creating inter-ledger transactions between Iroha and Fabric. If anyone in the community is interested in working on this together with us, please tell us on Rocket.Chat/gitter/github issue (https://github.com/hyperledger/iroha/issues/159).

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects and help us shape the future of blockchain. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: [email protected].

Happy coding!