Developer Showcase Series: Santiago Casaliglla, DNAsmartbits

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric

Our Developer Showcase blog series serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Santiago Casaliglla, CEO of DNAsmartbits. Let’s see what he has to say!

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain? 

They have to get information about how the technology works, from different sources and providers, to get a clear understanding of the benefits and implications of managing a distributed ledger. This is key in order to check if the approach of a blockchain application gives advantage to their projects compared to other possible solutions. I suggest this because of my first experience with the technology, which happened during my research at a German University. Our task was to develop a blockchain system for a distributed control. The traditional architecture of distributed control is based on a central controller to whom other slave controllers report and receive orders because the participants (controllers) agree that having a common regulator benefits all members. Then, the distributed control has sense between factories, in a permissioned closed group. The main target of the research was to replace this central controller with a distributed application. While developing the solution we found some issues due to a misunderstanding from the different parties involved on how a distributed ledger works. This was manifested in goals outside of the scope of what a blockchain can do. Mainly they kept the idea of a traditional central governor with high capacity of computational power to perform complex mathematical algorithms. At the end, and after some corrections and redefinitions the solution was feasible if the power of computation required was low. In this context, I started looking at Hyperledger since it clearly offers a customizable solution that can be applied to several industries.

Santiago Casaliglla, CEO of DNAsmartbits

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

I am the CEO and founder of the Ecuadorian IoT Company, DNAsmartbits. Our first product is a platform for mobile commerce that works with a prepaid balance to make purchases inside the system. This approach was meant to give access to the benefits of the platform without providing sensitive financial information like credit card numbers or bank accounts. Not even a bank account is needed. Six months ago I was researching how blockchain technologies can provide transparency to their participants while making efficient transactions and being scalable. I finally decided to power our product with a blockchain backend and a crypto token. I found an ideal structure within the Hyperledger Fabric project because of its permissioned blockchain architecture. At this point, I have to say that all fintech blockchain applications must become permissioned in order to avoid potential misuses while keeping the benefits and advantages the technology has.

What do you think is most important for Hyperledger to focus on in the next year?

I consider two things: 1. To divulge and promote educational tools to learn how Hyperledger works with a focus on the advantages it brings compared to the current solutions present in the market. 2. To promote the research of how Hyperledger can be implemented to improve existing systems. These two thins are keys to promoting a massive adoption of the technology. The more people adopt the system the better it becomes if it is open source, as Hyperledger is. Regarding the educational tools, they have to be specific for different levels of knowledge or backgrounds or interests. Regarding research, Hyperledger staff should try to get in contact with Universities and other educational centres to launch programs that may lead to interesting results and even more improvement of the platform.

What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

I am hoping we’ll see blockchain technology bring transparency to property ownership, government and individual identification in the next five years. Landing and property ownership registration presents issues in developing countries where the records of ownership are not keep in a proper manner and where the info generated in each transaction is not crossed or shared to other governmental institutions. This leads to difficulties and eventually ends in fraud when someone tries to buy land or property. Taxation and public services are also affected since it becomes difficult to identify the owner. To digitalize all the property titles and store them in a blockchain will give transparency, trust and an immutable history of the ownership of the land while controlling that only the current registered/recognized owner can promote and execute selling transactions over that land. The new owner before participating in the buying process should have been accepted to the network, which in turns brings more security and transparency to the transactions. As for government, the transactions executed for each governmental institution should be digitally signed and sealed by the representatives of the participant parties and permanently stored in a public immutable database in order to bring transparency to the administration, especially when it comes to managing public funds, and to provide a secure way to audit them in real time and by citizens or other institutions. Thus, blockchain has the power to eradicate corruption. As for individual identification, the previous solutions work with a basis of individual identification. In an era where business and transactions are going global, knowing for sure with whom you are dealing with is important to establish a trustful connection.


The Return of the Hyperledger Summer Internship Program

By | Blog, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Iroha

Calling all student developers: Summer 2018 is your time to get real-world experience in blockchain technologies through Hyperledger’s internship program. We’ve put together an extensive line-up of internship projects proposed and led by active blockchain developers looking to expand Hyperledger projects and the technical community by teaming with the next generation of engineers.

This is your chance for one-on-one mentorship from some of the leading technologists in the Hyperledger community, as well as to build your development portfolio of projects that will feed into the larger Hyperledger ecosystem. Did we mention that these internships include a stipend and the potential to participate in Hyperledger Global Forum in Basel, Switzerland, December 12-15th? And you can work from anywhere!

The application is now open and the deadline to apply is March 23. Read on for descriptions of just some of the projects planned for this summer.

“The Hyperledger Intern Program is a great opportunity for everyone: interns, mentors and the broader Hyperledger community. I had the privilege of seeing last summer’s interns do their readouts, and engage the Hyperledger community members in Lisbon, and was impressed with their work. The feedback was universally positive from all involved.” – Chris Ferris, Hyperledger TSC Chair

Algorithmic Dispute Resolution in Construction

Construction is the second largest global industrial sector. Litigation accounts for approximately 10% of the expenditure. The industry suffers from a dysfunctional relationship between the architects, project managers, consultants, developers, and clients. This is a phased project that will model the workflows of a major construction project, in partnership with a leading UK contractor/project management company. The aim is to identify all relevant material prior to the contract being signed, automating the discovery phase of litigation, machining the large data set down to a ‘hearing bundle’ and then assessing ‘needs and interests’ prior to an automated resolution process. This is the first phase of the project and will focus on identifying the workflows and relevant documents, files and other digital material and on assembling them in the blockchain where authentication can take place and a ‘hearing bundle’ prepared.

Extended Functionality/Support for EVM Smart Contracts and Tooling in Hyperledger Fabric

Hyperledger Burrow has created an EVM implementation that is being integrated into Fabric. In its initial phase, Hyperledger Fabric will support EVM bytecode smart contracts in a limited manner. Some of the features that need to be added include support for EVM smart contract events and extending support for the Ethereum API. This project will involve working with and understanding different blockchain platforms and being able to map their differing concepts.

Python Library for Hyperledger Iroha

Hyperledger Iroha is designed for simple creation and management of assets. This is a distributed ledger of transactions. Interns are expected to make a full fledged Python library for Iroha. Later, in the next stage, we want the intern to maintain the docs of Iroha. There are many missing docs on getting started and about the internal works of Iroha. We expect the student to complete the doc part along with dev work.

Hyperledger Identity WG On-boarding and Auth

The Hyperledger Identity WG intern will be mentored by members of the Identity WG / Hyperledger Indy Maintainers and accomplish two main tasks: learn and develop an iPython notebooks for onboarding new community members and a browser-based authentication app using decentralized identifiers in Hyperledger Indy. This bachelors-level internship has two core goals: experience and contribution.

    • Experience: The Identity WG Intern will create interoperable, open-source code that will educate new and existing Hyperledger community members. Creating an iPython notebook and code sample will be based on their own onboarding into Hyperledger and Indy, using what they have learned in the process and helping the community by identifying what would be more effective in a better onboarding experience. For browser-based authentication with DIDs, Interns will learn critical professional development skills, from working in GIT to understanding the structure of well-formed code, to developing their own tests and proper documentation best practices.
    • Contribution:Through developing both projects (iPython notebooks / code samples and browser-based authentication with DIDs), the Intern will be making an important contributions to future Hyperledger community members onboarding efforts, the Hyperledger Indy codebase and the entire decentralized identity ecosystem.

Hyperledger Composer Modeling Tools

The Hyperledger Composer modelling language is used by both Hyperledger Composer and the Accord Project, Cicero as an object-oriented data description (schema) language, based on a textual domain-specific language. The intern will be tasked with improving the tooling for the the Hyperledger Composer modelling language, including the ability to generate UML style diagrams and web-forms.

Read more details on the above projects and many more here. Then check out the requirements and application steps. Remember, applications are due by March 23, 2018.  

If you have any questions, please contact Remember, you can always plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing lists.

Developer Showcase Series: Abhinav Garg, Sofocle Technologies

By | Blog

Our Developer Showcase blog series serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Abhinav Garg, a blockchain developer at Sofocle Technologies.

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

Stay Focused. You first need to set your business goals and try to determine if they can be achieved by implementing blockchain. I believe blockchain is a vast developing technology that can make business relations more trustworthy, you just need to have a concrete idea for implementation to take advantage of blockchain’s innovative features.

Abhinav Garg, blockchain developer, Sofocle Technologies

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

We at Sofocle, are a blockchain technology based company, focused on building innovative products using blockchain and smart contracts. We design and develop blockchain powered enterprise solutions in banking, finance, and other industries. We have our own products based on blockchain. My first blockchain experience was with Hyperledger when it was in its initial development stage. The thought of permissioned blockchain in respect to transaction trust was a bit of fun. It’s easy to think of benefits related to the financial services industry and how permissioned ledgers in particular could be utilized.

What project in Hyperledger are you working on? Any new developments to share? Can you sum up your experience with Hyperledger?

We worked on several projects under Hyperledger. We intended to build solutions for supply chain, healthcare, insurance and several other fields. There are some key points that sum up Hyperledger’s beauty: loyalty, improved customer service, innovation and transparency.

What do you think is most important for Hyperledger to focus on in the next year?

We think that interoperability and privacy are two elements that have yet to be solved in an adequate way for blockchain software. I’d like to see more collaboration between the projects with a goal of achieving some level of interoperability.

What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

It’s a very general purpose technology. It can be used in all sorts of different verticals and industry areas. Just like you could use a database in any industry, you could use blockchain. It provides a logically centralised view of data even though data is physically and administratively distributed. One of the interesting areas blockchain is being used for is identity. One “hot area” is in supply chain, where multiple parties need access to common data while needing to protect their commercial interests.
In a supply chain you have lots of different parties collaborating, it’s very dynamic and participation in transactions can change dynamically. That sort of ad hoc structure can be a nice match of blockchain because anyone can potentially participate. Blockchain does have limitations. One of the limitations is that, out of the box, it’s not good for private or confidential data. It’s also not good for low latency or high throughput data – there are some scalability and performance limitations.

[VIDEO] Hyperledger Interviews Aaron Symanski, Change Healthcare

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric

Blockchain technologies hold the promise to unite the disparate processes in healthcare and ultimately improve patient experiences and outcomes. Key healthcare challenges around longitudinal records, identity management and access across multiple solutions all have the ability to be developed on top of blockchain technologies. By developing a shared platform that decentralizes health data without compromising the security of sensitive information, blockchain technologies could lift the costly burden of maintaining patient’s medical histories away from the hospitals, ultimately delivering cost savings back to the patient receiving care.

We spoke with Aaron Symanski, CTO of Change Healthcare about why they decided to join Hyperledger as a Premier member. According to Aaron, it was important for Change Healthcare to get involved with Hyperledger, as they are a leader in blockchain innovation in the healthcare space. Aaron believes blockchain can create a new paradigm for healthcare in data sharing and Change Healthcare is excited to be a part of it.

Change Healthcare will be at HIMSS this year along with Hyperledger. Drop by the Hyperledger booth at 9900-C in the Innovation Zone to learn about blockchain for healthcare and collect your Hyperledger swag! Representatives from Change Healthcare will be in the Hyperledger booth discussing insurance/clinical claims management as a blockchain for healthcare use case.

Emily Vaughn, Product Development Director at Change Healthcare, will speak on behalf of Hyperledger at HIMSS in the Innovation Live Theater on Thursday, March 8 at 3:00. Emily will present Change Healthcare’s Intelligent Healthcare Network, which deploys enterprise-scale, production-ready blockchain powered by Hyperledger Fabric 1.0. In this session, attendees will learn how business blockchain technologies can be used to process clinical, administrative and financial transactions covering $2 trillion in claims each year and ultimately improve the patient experience across the entire healthcare experience.

Emily will also participate in a panel with other Hyperledger members from Intel and Hashed Health on Tuesday, March 6, 9:30-10:30 a.m. “Blockchain Reset – Seeing Through the Hype and Starting Down the Path” will help attendees understand practical strategies for identifying blockchain use cases for your organization.

Learn more about Hyperledger’s onsite activities at HIMSS.

Hyperledger is committed to helping the healthcare industry realize the full potential of blockchain technologies. To this end, Hyperledger formed the Healthcare Working Group. Change Healthcare and other healthcare organizations have come together through this open forum with a mission to further education about appropriate applications for blockchain technologies in the healthcare industry. Through positive collaboration, the group fosters technical and business-level conversations about fundamental distributed ledger applications and how platforms associated with any healthcare solution utilizing a blockchain back-end could be impacted. For more resources, to track and participate in defining healthcare use cases or to join the working group mailing list, visit

Please enjoy and share Aaron’s full interview below!

Developer Showcase Series: Edmund To, Industrie&Co

By | Blog, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Fabric

Our Developer Showcase blog series serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Edmund To from Industrie&Co. Let’s see what he has to say!

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

At Industrie&Co, we work with both enterprises and startups to help solve business problems using a variety of technologies, including blockchain and distributed ledger technologies. We are currently engaging with industry leaders and domain experts to help build a number of blockchain-based ventures related to insurance, digital identity, peer-to-peer energy trading and carbon credit.

I first got into blockchain because of my curiosity around cryptocurrencies, but the more I learned about it, the more I believed in the underlying technology (i.e. blockchain), which is much more promising than it simply being a ledger for financial transactions. I soon came to realise it could potentially solve many problems in other domains.

Edmund To, software engineer, Industrie&Co

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

I have always preferred a hands-on approach. The documentation of Hyperledger is excellent. I would recommend starting with the tutorials and getting some sample implementations running. That way, you will have a clearer picture of the architecture of a permissioned blockchain. Once you are comfortable with that, I would suggest you to build a blockchain-based application even as a side project. Hyperledger Composer is an excellent tool for you to build data model and business logic for your blockchain application.

After that, I would encourage you to explore and learn about other blockchain protocols such as: Bitcoin, Ethereum, Corda, Ripple, and to compare them in terms of the architecture and the problem each intends to solve. It is important to understand how consensus algorithms are being implemented, in particular, how permissioned blockchains, like Hyperledger Fabric, which uses Practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance Algorithm by default, differs from public blockchain implementations such as Bitcoin and Ethereum, which use Proof of Work.

I also found learning the programming language ‘Go’ to be helpful. Not only because this is a well designed language, but because the most popular implementation of Hyperledger and Ethereum are written in Go. Reading the white paper of each blockchain protocol will help you in understanding the vision behind them. If you are interested in the academic aspect of blockchain, I would highly recommend the course titled ‘Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies’ by the Princeton University, which is free and available online.

What do you think is most important for Hyperledger to focus on in the next year?

Since Hyperledger Fabric has matured into 1.0 in June 2017, with over one hundred proof of concept applications being built, now is certainly the time to have some of these moving towards production. Also sharing the use cases with the community too would be great as there is a community of people out there who’d love to hear about what has been built with Hyperledger.

Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in 5 years?

I hope to see blockchain and Hyperledger being adopted outside of the finance industry. Today, we are very excited to see Hyperledger projects announced in different industries including: supply chain, healthcare, manufacturing, land registry and government. In five years time, it would be nice to see many of these projects be deployed and used by people on a daily basis.

What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?


I hope to see blockchain technology helping to increase transparency in organizations, in particular,  the non-profit space. By leveraging features such as smart contract and immutability of data, I believe this technology could transform the industry to be more transparent and efficient, and better in allocating resources to those who are in need.

Developer Showcase Series: Luc Yriarte & Zinedine Hasni, ChainOrchestra

By | Blog, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Fabric

Our Developer Showcase blog series serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Luc Yriarte and Zinedine Hasni  from ChainOrchestra. Let’s see what they have to say!

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

First things first. Blockchain is the buzzword of the day, before falling for the hype I would recommend taking a step back, and pondering what you are trying to achieve. Do you have a specific problem to solve that you feel that blockchain technology would help address, or do you want to provide a service based on the blockchain ?

If it’s the former, you might want to consider what blockchain has to offer regarding your specific need versus run of the mill encryption methods or just data replication. Some questions to ask yourself:

  1. Does your use-case involve several participants who don’t necessarily trust each other ?
  2. Is it something about transactions in the generalized acceptation of the term? For instance where a participant would transfer an asset to another, or provide some document, measure, or any other data that the other should read and acknowledge?
  3. Do you need to keep a record of these transactions ? Do all participants in your use-case want to know the transaction record is sound and unadulterated ?

Answering “no” to any of these questions means you are shooting yourself in the foot and should do something more straightforward. Otherwise… go for it!

Now what if you want to provide a service based on the blockchain ? There again, all hype and buzzword effect put aside, you need to consider if Hyperledger is right for you. The major existing blockchain instances Bitcoin and Ethereum are not going to disappear anytime soon, and it is very easy to deploy a solution on these systems – at least for now.

  1. Does your service need to be backed by a cryptocurrency, or is it more of a burden than anything else?
  2. Do you need to control membership access to your service?
  3. Will you need fine granularity and control on the transaction volume, speed, or size of the network?

If your service can be pegged to some cryptocurrency and you don’t need control over membership or network specifics, the legacy systems will do, otherwise… time to consider building your solution on Hyperledger.

Luc Yriarte and Zinedine Hasni of ChainOrchestra

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

I’m the lead engineer for ChainOrchestra, a start-up focused on blockchain network deployment and operation.

About 18 months ago, late winter of 2016, I had an encounter with some people who wanted to build a secure network for the Internet of Things, based on a blockchain. The advantages of the blockchain in this area are many, most obviously protecting sensor measures from being tampered with, but also triggering automated procedures in a secure way, and so on. First we started reviewing Ethereum, but it didn’t seem able to cope with the potential huge volume of sensor data to manage, and the needs for quick response time. And over all, the whole proof-of-work rewarded by crypto-currency scheme seemed just overkill for what we were trying to achieve.

Then, spring of 2016, we got invited as part of the local tech ecosystem to the IBM Client Center in our hometown of Montpellier, France, for a conference on Hyperledger. A few things ensued:

  1. We decided to give Hyperledger a go for our first prototypes.
  2. We figured that since we’d be deploying and managing blockchain networks for the IoT, we might as well do the same for the other use-cases.
  3. I was hired to do networking and IoT, I ended-up being the blockchain engineer for lack of other options.

Right after that, we got Zinedine Hasni, our devops and systems engineer, on board. As of summer 2016, we started working on our first Hyperledger Fabric v0.6 network and a few use-case demos.

Zinedine: “When we started working on this, we added just PDF support from an IBM workshop. At the time Hyperledger was at version 0.5, and was powering IBM’s Open Blockchain.

While I was digging into this documentation I was surprised to see a lot virtualisation programs (docker inside vagrant)

so we had to figure out what was worth focusing on.

Also a lot of stuff was new to me (blockchain included), I only used docker once before, during my studies at the 42 Paris engineering school.

So we started by analyzing all the yaml files to understand how it works, and learned golang to write our chaincode. We had to figure out why our peers were crashing and fix them (had to update rocksdb in the docker images), which was quite painful.”

…But eventually we got things to work.

The web-based demos, revolving mainly around private data management and IoT device control, were rather well received. Now we are on the final steps of releasing a pre-production Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 network that will allow us to address the different segments we are aiming for. The features added for Fabric v1.0, especially channels and certificate authorities, bring a whole lot of flexibility to the blockchain. But also these features add a new layer of complexity, justifying the role of blockchain network operator that we are taking on in the ecosystem.

As Hyperledger’s incubated projects start maturing and hit 1.0s and beyond, what are the most interesting technologies, apps, or use cases coming out as a result from your perspective?

Hyperledger Fabric has come a long way between the last stable v0.6 and v1.0, and as I just mentioned, a lot of these features are very relevant from a blockchain network operator perspective. I already mentioned the separate channels and the certificate authority servers, but the most salient feature in my opinion, the one that enables the others, is the orderer network. By having an orderer network independent from the business networks you manage, you can truly allow different use-cases to co-exist in the same blockchain. Engaging several different user communities around a single blockchain infrastructure without having to duplicate a history of irrelevant transactions on each and every server becomes possible.

Then there are the other, user-related Hyperledger projects. Hyperledger Composer will most likely become the application framework of choice as app development for Hyperledger becomes more mainstream. On the same token, we are following with the Hyperledger Cello project with a lot of interest. Cello is aimed at blockchain network management, pretty much our core business. We are currently on an early evaluation phase, but we’d love to be able to participate at some point.

Zinedine: “Right now we are taking a bottom up approach to build our network with several organisations, channels, certificates authorities in addition to committer and endorser peers without forgetting orderers, kafka, zookeepers…(and SBFT coming soon).

The main goal for us is to get to the bare bones of all those components and build incrementally from there.”

We are also digging into the other Hyperledger implemenations besides Fabric, i.e. Sawtooth, Iroha and Indy. We consider the ability to have several implementations at hand, with different consensus mechanisms, very important. That’s a bit of a longer term perspective, but the flexibility that those implementation bring will be needed to address a wide range of areas, from the IoT to traditional businesses.

What technology could you not live without?

Running water. Like most people on this earth. And also electricity… and the internet. I’m old enough to have developed software when the internet didn’t exist, and I really wouldn’t want to go back. And when you look at it this way, Hyperledger being more of a protocol than an implementation of a blockchain, is the next layer of the internet, right after IP and the World Wide Web.

Blockchain: A Shared Noun

By | Blog

Guest post: Aaron Symanski, CTO, Change Healthcare

In many of the discussions that I have had regarding blockchain, business models are a frequent topic. Why use a new technology like blockchain instead of an existing, well understood, proven, cost effective technology? What makes blockchain radically different?

To answer, let’s start with a simple history of the evolution of communication, the evolution of how one person shared a concept with another person. What was visual (point at it), became verbal (speak and hear), became written (write and read), and then became an electronic transmission. Telegraph became radio became television. Each approach was essentially the same: describe something in enough detail such that the listener could create the same picture in their mind or on their device.

In these approaches, the sender strives for enough detail that the listener can create an identical view. Complete accuracy is difficult.  Differences are basically guaranteed, especially if changes occur to the picture by either party. Reconciliations attempt to repair the differences.  Doubts gather whether the sender and receiver are staying on the same page. In some cases, the cost of reconciliation is so high that it is simply ignored and differences accumulate.

Some mitigations have arisen. The simplistic sending of a flat file, as a description of the object, has moved to the use of APIs. Systems now agree to the verbs used with an object and to use the verbs to communicate actions about the object. These verbs make up an API. With such, two or more systems can communicate about an object without actually exchanging the object.  Color the car red, Credit the account $500.

Blockchain technology adds a new approach to our toolkits. Blockchain technology enables the sender and receiver to always interact with the same object, the same noun. The local copy of the object is complete and synchronized across each participant of the blockchain network. No explicit interpretation or reconciliation needed. We now have a new tool, a new ability to share the noun, a single noun. The historic approaches of trying to describe, create, and work through verbs are not limiters any more.

By sharing the noun, blockchains create opportunities for new paradigms where all participants see the same object and every change to the object. The verbs do not need to be agreed upon. This freedom to interact with the noun, a shared object, without agreement as to how, is a very different and new approach.

How do we think about existing business models in a model of sharing the noun? Submitting a medical claim becomes simply placing it on the blockchain. After that, all participants can edit, approve, pay, reject, bundle, and take any action they want on the claim. Imagine six companies, sharing a blockchain. Each has connected their systems to the blockchain to take action as changes are seen on the chain, and to submit their own changes to the chain. Everyone on the network can work simultaneously. As every participant sees every change on the claim, taking action on edits becomes easy and automatic.

This model of sharing a noun is unlike any business process today. No longer restricted by previous modes of communication, we can each see the same noun and operate on it together. We have an opportunity to move from linear, assembly-line workflows to constant and simultaneous interaction. This is an exciting opportunity and to explore it, we must begin using blockchains in our production processes. We should not seek the “killer app.” Instead, we should create a thousand new opportunities for new interactions, value creation, and niches in our ecosystems. As these opportunities succeed and some fail, we will learn. Let’s begin exploring the uncharted areas of our maps.

Developer Showcase Series: Todd Cooper & James Sloan, NuArca

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric

Jumping back to our Developer Showcase blog series, which serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Todd Cooper and James Sloan from NuArca. Let’s see what they have to say!

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

Dive right in.  The pace of change is so fast in this space that getting caught up can be a relatively quick process.  I think the term ‘blockchain’ still covers a lot of ground so it makes sense to narrow your focus a bit.  If you are interested in cryptocurrencies then dive into Bitcoin, Ethereum and token sales in that order. Go out and set up a wallet and buy a small amount of bitcoin just for the experience.  Then look it up on a bitcoin explorer to see the history of the transactions.

To start to get familiar with the underlying code the open source community is great in terms of being open to participation and providing resources for learning.  Start by downloading Hyperledger Fabric, writing your own Smart Contract and setting up a network of Docker nodes or develop your own token on Ethereum’s test network in Solidity. If you are looking to familiarize yourself with the innovation in this space, every ICO is publishing a new whitepaper exploring new concepts in blockchain and while the quality may vary, you can get a sense of what is happening.

Finally, there are lots of networks out there on Slack, Twitter, Telegram and Meetups that are occurring all around the world. Start talking to other people to find out what they are doing.

James Sloan, EVP Product Management, NuArca

Todd Cooper, CEO and Co-founder, NuArca

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

NuArca is working with AST (American Stock and Transfer) to deliver a blockchain and machine learning enabled proxy voting solution. AST is one of the largest proxy voting solutions in the market, and the NuArca built system will be used by thousands of corporations and funds to define, manage, and record their proxy vote issuances and annual shareholder voting. This solution will facilitate greater transparency and confidence in data handling, allowing issuers to make more informed decisions and strategy adjustments.  It will also allow AST’s proxy solicitation experts to access advanced predictive analytics to guide complex proxy solicitations.

What project in Hyperledger are you working on? Any new developments to share? Can you sum up your experience with Hyperledger?

Our primary focus at this time is on deploying the Proxy voting solution using Hyperledger Fabric. We will be live by end of September with more than 2 million unique voters representing over 1 trillion shares. This first project stage is focused on parallel record keeping with existing proxy systems. When all goes well, the Fabric based system NuArca built will become the system of record for proxy voting. By Q2 2019, ~40% of all fund proxy voting will be using this system.

To date, Hyperledger has been great, but does require full time tracking of changes in both technology incorporation as well as deployment. It is new enough that this is completely understandable, but anyone getting involved should know that they are working in a fast moving and dynamic system in which time must be invested to understand and leverage.

What do you think is most important for Hyperledger to focus on in the next year?

Scalability and effectively getting the news out on the good enterprise class solutions that are starting to come out using Hyperledger. Much of the tech industry press and financial services press are focused on coins and tokens. Meanwhile, Hyperledger solutions are proving themselves scalable and practical. The Hyperledger community can do a better job of helping to make that knowledge resonate in the market.

From a specific technology gap standpoint, we are particularly looking to have support of Hyperledger on Red Hat rather than Debian as that is the OS of choice for much of the financial services industry. We anticipate needing ongoing improvements to performance and scalability as we grow the solution.  

As Hyperledger’s incubated projects start maturing and hit 1.0s and beyond, what are the most interesting technologies, apps, or use cases coming out as a result from your perspective?

In general, it is the practical use of the technology available today that is most interesting. Hyperledger is not a pie in the sky visage that may come into its own 5 – 10 years down the road. It is here today and can better solve specific types of problems better than yesterday’s technology base.

What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

Confidence and accuracy in electoral voting.

Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in 5 years?

Providing a backbone for strong, private blockchains to various industries that are being used to solve various business challenges. An accepted standard similar to Linux.

What is the best piece of developer advice you’ve ever received?

At some point in every project, it is time to shoot the developer and ship the software. Knowing where that point of time is requires decades of experience, and makes all the difference in the world.

What technology could you not live without?

Cloud service models. The convenience and cross platform synchronization is making a truly mobile life possible. One reason blockchain is needed is to ensure the ongoing security, privacy, and resiliency of these models that are increasingly pulling us towards full reliance on external and potentially vulnerable information management models.

Hyperledger Fabric 1.0 Release Process

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric

By David Huseby, Hyperledger Security Maven

As an open source project  that is part of the Linux Foundation, Hyperledger takes on a great deal of responsibility to deliver software using a process that is transparent, proactive, and uses the best security practices. This blog post is about the release process for Hyperledger projects reaching the version 1.0 milestone. It is the first in a series focused on the Hyperledger security regime. The next post in this series will focus on everything we do to make good on the promise of open source software being more secure.

When Hyperledger Fabric 1.0 was released on July 11th, 2017 several administrative initiatives were under way. The first of these was an audit of the source code to determine the open source licenses the software was under. Hyperledger uses the Apache 2.0 License for all of its original software and strives to only depend on other code licensed under the same or equally compatible licenses.

The second initiative was a cryptography export audit conducted by the Software Freedom Law Center. Despite a victory in the “crypto wars,” since blockchains require heavily on the latest cryptography, we still have a reporting requirement for all cryptography that we include in our software.

The third initiative was an outside security audit. The Hyperledger team contracted an outside firm named Nettitude to do an independent audit of the Fabric source code. The purpose was to get confirmation of the soundness of the software and to establish a baseline for its security.  The team at Nettitude did a great job going through the source code and attempting penetration tests and running fuzzing processes against Fabric.

Nettitude is delighted to have had the opportunity to work with The Linux Foundation to assess the security of their Hyperledger Fabric blockchain software. This was an exciting and timely piece of work, in a field which Nettitude had already identified as one of our security research priorities.

The end results of the audit showed only a couple medium grade security issues that have since been mitigated. One issue was a general lack of comments in the code that documented the expected behavior of the code. This is an important detail because programmers can look at the code and figure out what it does, but bugs lurk in the difference between what the original programmer intended and what the code actually does. Having thorough comments in the code helps reduce the risk of a security regression occurring during future software maintenance work.  

The other issue was focused on the general security of the Docker container used to execute chain code. The principle of least authority dictates that the Docker container should be restricted and isolated as much as possible. Today, we are finally publishing the Hyperledger Fabric 1.0 security audit report. We have published the technical report and the management report documents.

This process will be applied to all of the other Hyperledger projects as they reach the 1.0 milestone.. The next project to go through it is Hyperledger Sawtooth. The license, crypto, and security audits for Sawtooth have already been completed and readers should expect its 1.0 release in the very near future. Stay tuned for the follow up with the Sawtooth security audit report.If you would like to help us make great software, the Hyperledger community has organized meetups and hackfests all over the world. If you find a security issue please report it to You can find an upcoming event near you by visiting our events page here: We’ll also be talking at RSA this year in April in San Francisco. Director of Ecosystem, Marta Pierkarska and I will present “Blockchain-the new black. What about enterprise security?” We hope to see you there!

Developer Showcase Series: Rohit Aneja, Bristlecone Labs

By | Blog, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Fabric

We’re back to our Developer Showcase blog series, which serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Rohit Aneja from Bristlecone Labs. Let’s see what he has to say!

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

One needs to be open minded – It is very new technology and many are interested in it due to its popularity. Many don’t know what it does. Also, there are many platforms claiming to be blockchain frameworks, but real frameworks that offer end to end blockchain needs ranging from membership service to smart contracts are rare, so developer needs to be well versed with knowledge and open minded for selecting a technology and implementing it.

Platform – Permissionless or permissioned – It is very important to identify which type of network is suitable for your needs. Like enterprise level networks where each member has some role and is known can leverage a permissioned network, also known as a private network.

Identify use case and problem solution – Identifying use case and finding a value prop for each participant on network is significant before making a solution. It may work for one party, but since the network needs participation from all members who are required on network, it is important to have use case which serve purpose to everyone.

Give back – contribute to open source – This is very important for every developer, consuming open source platforms or making solutions around it. Open source platforms rely on contributions and an active community. Answering questions, being active on forums is a must if you really want to explore, learn and master a framework.

Rohit Aneja, blockchain engineer, Bristlecone Labs

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

At my organisation, Bristlecone Labs, I work as a blockchain engineer and prosper innovative solutions to serve supply chain specific use-cases. We have developed IOE + Blockchain solution based on Hyperledger Fabric 0.6 while 1.0 was still in its alpha phase. The solution is aimed at logging real time sensors data in its immutable ledgers and executing smart contracts on sensor data.

One of the use cases being smart contracts which execute on every sensor reading and checks if sensor crossed specific threshold, which may mean perishables are exposed to unsuitable conditions and have spoiled due to this. The system can help not only record such breach of contracts in immutable ledgers but can also identify responsible shipper and take corrective actions in real time. There is avoidance of any conflict with system in place and real time sensory data, optimisation and efficiency can be achieved by identifying rough routes and avoiding them, by having shock detecting sensors on shipping trucks transporting delicate or fragile shipments.

As blockchain is key to achieving the above scenarios where distributed participants can agree upon consensus, and benefit on big picture out of this system.

As there is a high interest from various big players as well as small players, plus the nature of blockchain platforms (being distributed, open source) also makes it available to everyone, by everyone, there is no “single owner” of these platforms and this technology but all of us working on blockchain are. This is one important fact which motivated me to jump into blockchain engineering and learn, contribute and innovate passionately for the better of the world.

What project in Hyperledger are you working on? Any new developments to share? Can you sum up your experience with Hyperledger?

Currently, I am developing a business network on Hyperledger Composer, although it’s in early stage of its development, it will be mostly a network of networks that will have suppliers identify an optimised supply path as well as have competitive advantage for being on a network than suppliers playing alone.

Hyperledger has been constantly evolving and has a very active community. Availability of production ready system that has high security and scalability in such early stages of blockchain technology is a bliss for developers. Availability of high quality documents and tutorials makes it easy for developers to jump into complex world of blockchain. As I started my Blockchain journey with Hyperlegder, after making some solutions, I have never felt short changed of features and possibilities that the framework offers. Having an active community with regular meetups and weekly updates keeps us flowing with recent changes and recommended coding guidelines.

What do you think is most important for Hyperledger to focus on in the next year?

I think, tools that make achieving end to end solutions faster and easier will definitely attract lots of audience and developers around the globe. Blockchain can be a complex topic for people from different backgrounds and giving tools for rapid development like Hyperledger Composer is a great value prop for people to adopt a simple and fast solution.

Keeping focus in improving such tools will really drive a large base towards Hyperledger framework. It is incredible what Hyperledger is doing and especially keeping it open source and public driven complements technology like blockchain, which at a core is – “there is no central authority.” Offering a framework which is contributed by the developer community around the globe, there is no way it can go wrong with great mediators and helpful, passionate organisers.

Blockchain is really going to have a big impact on how things function as of now (hence disruptive), and when business realizes true potentials of it, that’s when early adopters are going to really benefit.